Lead Stories

U.S.
4:37 am
Mon March 30, 2015

Open Cases: Why One-Third Of Murders In America Go Unresolved

Detective Mark Williams (right) speaks with an officer in Richmond, Va. A decade ago, amid a surge in violent crime, Richmond police were identifying relatively few murder suspects. So the police department refocused its efforts to bring up its "clearance rate."
Alex Matzke for NPR

Originally published on Mon March 30, 2015 7:12 am

If you're murdered in America, there's a 1 in 3 chance that the police won't identify your killer.

To use the FBI's terminology, the national "clearance rate" for homicide today is 64.1 percent. Fifty years ago, it was more than 90 percent.

And that's worse than it sounds, because "clearance" doesn't equal conviction: It's just the term that police use to describe cases that end with an arrest, or in which a culprit is otherwise identified without the possibility of arrest — if the suspect has died, for example.

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U.S.
4:12 am
Mon March 30, 2015

How Many Crimes Do Your Police 'Clear'? Now You Can Find Out

Violent crime in America has been falling for two decades. That's the good news. The bad news is, when crimes occur, they mostly go unpunished.

In fact, for most major crimes, police don't even make an arrest or identify a suspect. That's what police call "clearing" a crime; the "clearance rate" is the percentage of offenses cleared.

In 2013, the national clearance rate for homicide was 64 percent, and it's far lower for other violent offenses and property crimes.

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NPR Story
4:04 am
Mon March 30, 2015

Politics In The News: Religious Freedom Act

Originally published on Mon March 30, 2015 5:40 am

Copyright 2015 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

NPR Story
4:04 am
Mon March 30, 2015

Congressional Panels Probe Opiate Prescriptions At Wis. VA Hospital

Originally published on Mon March 30, 2015 5:52 am

Copyright 2015 Wisconsin Public Radio. To see more, visit http://www.wpr.org.

Code Switch
4:04 am
Mon March 30, 2015

In New York's Multinational Astoria, Diversity Is Key To Harmony

Catholic Charities Brooklyn and Queens holds classes for people who are learning English as a second language. A teacher leads the class in a rendition of Eric Clapton's "Wonderful Night."
Alexandra Starr

Originally published on Mon March 30, 2015 5:59 am

Queens, N.Y., is one of the most diverse urban spaces in the world, and one of the most diverse neighborhoods in Queens is Astoria, across the East River from upper Manhattan.

Astoria has a reputation as New York City's Greektown, but it's more like an urban United Nations. People from nearly 100 countries live there, according to census data.

They coexist pretty peacefully, but that wasn't always the case. The explosion of diversity has helped foster a more tranquil community.

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