Lead Stories

It's All Politics
4:23 pm
Thu May 28, 2015

Drug Overdose, On The Rise, Cropping Up As Campaign Issue

New Jersey Gov. Chris Christie participated in a roundtable discussion at the Farnum Center in Manchester, N.H. earlier this month.
Jim Cole AP

Originally published on Thu May 28, 2015 4:49 pm

As presidential candidates visit the early caucus and primary states of Iowa and New Hampshire, they're hearing about heroin and meth. Drug overdoses now kill more Americans than traffic accidents. And, in many places, there's a growing acceptance that this isn't just a problem for other people.

New Hampshire is in the throes of a crisis. Last year more than 300 people in the small state died of drug overdoses. Mostly opiods like oxycontin and heroin.

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The Salt
4:23 pm
Thu May 28, 2015

Why A Journalist Scammed The Media Into Spreading Bad Chocolate Science

Eating a chocolate bar daily can help you lose weight? Sorry, that study was a sweet lie — part of an elaborate hoax to school the news media about proper nutrition science journalism.
iStockphoto

Originally published on Thu May 28, 2015 5:17 pm

Earlier this spring, headlines around the world trumpeted an exciting bit of news that seemed too good to be true: "Eating that bar of chocolate can HELP you lose weight," as Britain's Daily Mail put it.

From India to Australia and Texas to Germany, news organizations shared findings published in the International Archives of Medicine in late March.

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The Two-Way
4:18 pm
Thu May 28, 2015

FCC Chairman Wants To Help Low Income Americans Afford Broadband

A government program called Lifeline subsidizes basic phone service for low-income people. Now, the head of the Federal Communications Commission also wants to use the program to pay for broadband Internet connections, which many poor people lack.

When it comes to the Internet, FCC Chairman Tom Wheeler says there are the haves and the have nots. Ninety-five percent of households with incomes over $150,000 a year have broadband access, he says. But just 48 percent of households making under $25,000 do.

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Shots - Health News
3:24 pm
Thu May 28, 2015

What We Know About Tattoo Reactions Only Goes Skin-Deep

A tattoo that starts as a personal statement can sometimes have medical consequences.
Meredith Rizzo/NPR

For about as long as there have been humans, it seems there have been tattoos.

Ötzi the Iceman, the 5,000-year-old mummy discovered in the Alps in 1991, had 61 tattoos covering his body. And a quick look around the local coffee shop reveals they're just about as popular today. By one estimate, about a quarter of U.S. adults have at least one tattoo.

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Parallels
3:06 pm
Thu May 28, 2015

Does Less Latin Mean Dumbing Down? France Debates School Reform

Striking French teachers hold a German flag as they take part in a nationwide protest against new measures aimed at revamping the country's school system, in Marseille, France, on May 19. France's 840,000 teachers are largely opposed to the reform, their unions say, fearing it will increase competition between schools and exacerbate inequalities.
Jean-Paul Pelissier Reuters/Landov

Originally published on Thu May 28, 2015 5:15 pm

Reforming the education system in any country can be tricky. But in France, where learning is highly centralized and public school (l'ecole de la Republique) a symbol of French greatness, it's all but impossible.

Several French presidents have tried and failed. President Francois Hollande's second attempt has traditionalists up in arms and critics on the right and left screaming that French schools are being dumbed down.

Teachers, students and some parents took to the streets of cities across the country recently to denounce the government's project.

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