Lead Stories

NPR Story
4:14 am
Wed January 28, 2015

Studies Critical Of Bilingual Benefits Often Shelved Because Of Bias

Originally published on Wed January 28, 2015 5:20 am

Copyright 2015 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

The Two-Way
2:36 am
Wed January 28, 2015

Officers Ask Map App To Remove Police-Tracking

Waze allows users to share when they've seen a police officer. Law enforcement officials say that could put police in danger.
Waze

Originally published on Wed January 28, 2015 4:14 am

Waze, the popular navigation app boasting more than 50 million users worldwide, has a new critic: police officers. Over the last few weeks, law enforcement officials have been urging the app and its owner, Google, to disable a feature that allows users to report when they've spotted a police officer, in real time, for all other Waze users to see.

Sergio Kopelev, a reserve sheriff in Orange County, Calif., is one of the law enforcement officials behind the push to remove Waze's police-tracker. He says he first discovered the feature through his family.

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Shots - Health News
2:30 am
Wed January 28, 2015

VA Steps Up Programs As More Veterans Enter Hospice Care

A hospital bed is draped with a flag after a veteran passed away at the hospice ward at St. Albans VA in Queens, N.Y.
Quil Lawrence NPR

Originally published on Wed January 28, 2015 4:14 am

Starting last year, more military veterans are passing away in hospice care than in all of VA trauma and ICU wards combined.

That's because the millions of Americans who served in Korea and World War II are reaching their 80s and 90s; Vietnam veterans are reaching their 70s. That means the U.S. Department of Veterans Affairs is focusing on how to make veterans comfortable in their final weeks and months.

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Parallels
2:26 am
Wed January 28, 2015

Singing The Blues, A U.S. Envoy Hopes To Boost Ties With Ecuador

Adam Namm, U.S. Ambassador to Ecuador and musician member of Samay Blues Band.
Alejandro Reinoso for NPR

Originally published on Wed January 28, 2015 4:14 am

Shortly before taking the stage at a bar in Quito, Ecuador's capital, the local band Samay Blues plugs in for a sound check.

Among the audience are a number of Americans. That's because the word is out: U.S. Ambassador Adam Namm will be sitting in on keyboards.

"I'm glad to get out of the office once in a while," Namm tells a patron. "Thanks for coming."

In a region where many left-wing leaders are hostile to the United States, Namm has found a novel way to reach out to his host country.

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Around the Nation
2:25 am
Wed January 28, 2015

Homeless Man Encourages Others On The Streets To 'Get Up'

Tony Simmons leads a group of Johns Hopkins University students on a "justice walk" of downtown Baltimore, where they learn about public policy, providing services, and the connections between income inequality and health.
Gabriella Demczuk for NPR

Originally published on Wed January 28, 2015 4:14 am

This story begins an occasional series about individuals who don't have much money or power but do have a big impact on their communities.

Sometimes, the people you least expect are those who do the most. People like Tony Simmons, a homeless man in Baltimore who helps others get off the street. Simmons says he does it as much for himself as for anyone else.

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