Lead Stories

NPR Story
4:01 am
Wed April 1, 2015

Comedy Central Backs New 'Daily Show' Host Despite Insensitive Tweets

Originally published on Wed April 1, 2015 5:34 am

Copyright 2015 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

NPR Ed
4:01 am
Wed April 1, 2015

The Opposite Of The Dean's List

The Education Department, headed by Secretary Arne Duncan, says it's keeping a close eye on 556 colleges and universities that do a poor job of complying with federal regulations and handling federal financial aid.
Jacquelyn Martin AP

Originally published on Wed April 1, 2015 9:56 am

No school wants to be on this list.

It was just released by the Department of Education. On it are the names of 556 colleges and universities that failed the department's "financial responsibility test."

Undersecretary of Education Ted Mitchell says that each school's finances are now being placed under a microscope because the government "had serious concerns about the financial integrity of the institution or its administrative capacity."

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NPR Story
4:01 am
Wed April 1, 2015

Understanding The Forces At Play In Yemen's Civil War

Originally published on Wed April 1, 2015 6:36 am

Copyright 2015 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

NPR Story
4:01 am
Wed April 1, 2015

No Joke. Flood Insurance Rates Increase On April 1

Originally published on Wed April 1, 2015 8:47 am

Copyright 2015 WSHU Public Radio Group. To see more, visit http://www.wshu.org/.

Goats and Soda
2:55 am
Wed April 1, 2015

Engineer Turned Cabbie Helps New Refugees Find Their Way

After a long day at the Somali American Community Center he founded in Clarkston, Ga., and then at an after-school program, Omar Shekhey drives a taxi to earn extra money. Often he gives his earnings to refugees to help them with expenses.
Kevin Liles for NPR

Originally published on Wed April 1, 2015 11:21 am

This story is part of an occasional series about individuals who don't have much money or power but do have a big impact on their communities.

Almost 70,000 refugees — victims of war, hardship and persecution — are allowed into the U.S. each year. But settling into their new homes can be a challenge, from learning English to figuring out how to turn on the dishwasher.

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