Lead Stories

NPR Story
4:02 am
Tue January 27, 2015

Obama Takes Heat For Proposing To End College Savings Break

Originally published on Tue January 27, 2015 6:05 am

Copyright 2015 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

NPR Story
4:02 am
Tue January 27, 2015

Greece Looks To Renegotiate Bailout Terms

Originally published on Tue January 27, 2015 8:06 am

Copyright 2015 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

Shots - Health News
2:48 am
Tue January 27, 2015

Child Abuse And Neglect Laws Aren't Being Enforced, Report Finds

Will Crocker Getty Images

Originally published on Tue January 27, 2015 10:15 am

Laws intended to protect children from abuse and neglect are not being properly enforced, and the federal government is to blame. That's according to a study by the Children's Advocacy Institute at the University of San Diego School of Law, which says children are suffering as a result.

The numbers are grim. Almost 680,000 children in the United States were the victims of abuse and neglect in 2013. More than 1,500 of them died.

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Movies
2:39 am
Tue January 27, 2015

'Stronger Than Ever' Sundance Docs Tackle Scientology, Campus Rape

Alex Gibney's Going Clear is based on a book by Pulitzer Prize-winning author Lawrence Wright.
Sam Painter Courtesy of Sundance Institute

Originally published on Tue January 27, 2015 10:00 am

Over in Park City, Utah, the Sundance Film Festival is in full swing. Critic Kenneth Turan tells NPR's Renee Montagne about some of the festival's must-see films, including documentaries about Scientology, rape on college campuses and Nina Simone, and a romantic drama based on a novel by Colm Tóibín.


Interview Highlights

On the festival's stand-out documentaries

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Parallels
2:37 am
Tue January 27, 2015

Russian Threats Expose Europe's Military Cutbacks

A soldier from the Swedish army participates in a military exercise at Hagshult Airbase in Sweden in November.
Jonathan Nackstrand AFP/Getty Images

Originally published on Tue January 27, 2015 10:00 am

An international cat-and-mouse game played out in the waters of Stockholm a few months ago.

The "mouse" was a foreign submarine — Russia is the main suspect — that got away.

And as Russia's military becomes more aggressive, European leaders fear they do not have the military power to deal with this new threat.

Take Sweden, for instance. Its days of military might are long gone.

The numbers tell the story, says Karlis Neretnieks, who used to run Sweden's National Defense College and has had a long career in the military.

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