Lead Stories

Goats and Soda
6:03 am
Fri July 3, 2015

Peruvian Sisters Can Turn A Gourd Into An $800 Objet D'Art

Standing in their backyard in Cochas Grande, Peru, Katya and Blanca Cantos, hold the fruit of their labor. The gourd at left shows scenes from a potato harvest. The just-started gourd at right will tell the story of an ancestor's epic trek.
Josh Cogan Ralph Rinzler Folklife Archive, Smithsonian Institution

Originally published on Fri July 3, 2015 12:13 pm

Their gourds tell a story — and earn them a living. That gourd in the photo — the one on the left? It is covered with miniature pictures of a potato harvest in Peru. There's even a wee burro hauling the day's crop.

That gourd will sell for around $800.

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The Salt
6:03 am
Fri July 3, 2015

New Nation, New Cuisine: The First Cookbook To Tackle 'American Food'

A recent version of Indian Slapjacks, a recipe featured in American Cookery, the first cookbook of American food.
Premshree Pillai Flickr

Originally published on Fri July 3, 2015 11:45 am

In 1776, the American colonies declared independence from Britain.

But it wasn't until 1796 that someone dared to tackle a question that would plague every generation of Americans to come: "What is American food?"

American Cookery, the very first American cookbook, was written by Amelia Simmons (more on this mysterious woman later). In it, she promised local food and a kind of socioculinary equality. The title page stated that the recipes were "adapted to this country and all grades of life."

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Europe
4:06 am
Fri July 3, 2015

When Greeks Vote Sunday, It's Not Just About A Debt Deal

A man waits at an Athens bus stop where the Greek word "no" has been spray-painted over "yes" on a banner put up in advance of Sunday's referendum. Greek voters will say whether they want to accept or reject a deal that's been offered by the country's creditors. Greeks are deeply divided and analysts say the outcome is not clear.
Thanassis Stavrakis AP

Originally published on Fri July 3, 2015 11:20 am

Elisavet Zachariadou is a retired professor of history in Athens. She admires Italian art and reads French literature and German philosophy. She considers herself a European.

"When I learned that Greece is going to be part of the European Union [in the 1980s], I was very happy," she recalls. "And I said, 'How nice. And how good for all of us.' "

But Zachariadou's attachment to Europe is complex. She's 84 and lives in the Athens suburb where she grew up during World War II, when Nazi Germany invaded Greece and her people suffered horribly.

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NPR Story
4:06 am
Fri July 3, 2015

The Legal Business Of Marijuana Is Growing But The Industry Lacks Diversity

Originally published on Fri July 3, 2015 6:41 am

Copyright 2015 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

NPR Story
4:06 am
Fri July 3, 2015

Implementation Of Obamacare Remains A Work In Progress

Originally published on Fri July 3, 2015 6:33 am

Copyright 2015 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

Transcript

LINDA WERTHEIMER, HOST:

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