Lead Stories

NPR Story
4:14 am
Wed January 28, 2015

First Listen: Israeli Singer Asaf Avidan

Originally published on Wed January 28, 2015 7:09 am

Copyright 2015 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

NPR Story
4:14 am
Wed January 28, 2015

Bilingual Studies Reveal Flaw In How Info Reaches Mainstream

Originally published on Wed January 28, 2015 7:08 am

Copyright 2015 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

NPR Story
4:14 am
Wed January 28, 2015

Judge To Exonerate 'Friendship 9' Activists 54 Years After Arrest

Originally published on Wed January 28, 2015 7:09 am

Nearly 54 years after their arrest, some of the first civil rights protesters to serve prison time for sitting at an all-white lunch counter were back in court Wednesday. A judge in Rock Hill, South Carolina cleared them of their convictions for trespassing.

In 1961, a group of nine college students from Friendship College walked into McCrory's Five and Dime Drugstore and sat down in protest to legal segregation in restaurants. Blacks were forbidden from sitting at the lunch counter so they were quickly taken to jail.

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The Two-Way
2:36 am
Wed January 28, 2015

Officers Ask Map App To Remove Police Tracking

The logo of mobile app Waze is displayed on a table. Waze is a community-based traffic and navigation app.
Lionel Bonaventure AFP/Getty Images

Originally published on Wed January 28, 2015 11:57 am

Waze, the popular navigation app boasting more than 50 million users worldwide, has a new critic: police officers. Over the past few weeks, law enforcement officials have been urging the app and its owner, Google, to disable a feature that allows users to report when they've spotted a police officer, in real time, for all other Waze users to see.

Sergio Kopelev, a reserve sheriff in Orange County, Calif., is one of the law enforcement officials behind the push to remove Waze's police tracker. He says he first discovered the feature through his family.

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Shots - Health News
2:30 am
Wed January 28, 2015

VA Steps Up Programs As More Veterans Enter Hospice Care

A hospital bed is draped with a flag after a veteran died in the hospice ward at St. Albans VA in Queens, N.Y.
Quil Lawrence NPR

Originally published on Wed January 28, 2015 10:25 am

Ask Americans if someone in their family served in the military, and the answer is probably no. After all, fewer than 1 percent of Americans serve these days.

But ask if one of their grandfathers served, and you'll likely get a different answer. Between World War II and the wars in Korea and Vietnam, millions of men were drafted into service — and both men and women volunteered.

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