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Clinton Makes History As Democratic Presidential Nominee

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=q9tMnZKsRPY The Democratic National Convention made history Tuesday evening: Amid applause, shouts, cheers and in some cases tears, the delegates on the floor of the Wells Fargo Center in Philadelphia nominated Hillary Clinton for president of the United States.Clinton is now the first female presidential candidate of a major American party.It is a historic moment 150 years in the making, starting when suffragettes demanded the right to vote and Victoria Claflin...
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RENEE MONTAGNE, HOST:

The man who shot Ronald Reagan in 1981 is now set to go free.

(SOUNDBITE OF ARCHIVED RECORDING)

In the Facebook Live video streamed earlier this month by Diamond Reynolds after her fiance, Philando Castile, was fatally shot by a police officer during a traffic stop in a Minnesota suburb, Reynolds identified the man who shot Castile as "Chinese" as she narrated the scene.

John Hinckley Jr., 35-years after he tried to kill a president, has won his freedom.

A federal judge in Washington, D.C., has granted a request for Hinckley to leave the mental hospital where he's resided for decades, to go live full-time with his elderly mother in Williamsburg, Va.

Mission Waco

With poverty comes many problems. Along with a low socio-economic status, many impoverished families face debilitating legal problems that continue to erode their income. For KWBU, Sakina Haji reports that one local organization trying to alleviate this.
 


A street in Qamishli, a city in northern Syria that sits along the border with Turkey, was hit by a powerful car bomb Wednesday, killing at least 44 people and devastating a residential area, according to Syria's state-run media. Nearby buildings were severely damaged, collapsing walls and floors.

There was a time when Sandra Gologergen's freezer never ran out. Packed with traditional Inuit foods like whale, walrus, seal and fish, her freezer has been an essential lifeline, ensuring her husband, three kids and grandson make it through the long harsh winters of Savoonga, Alaska.

"Then that changed," she says.

The Tuesday night session of the Democratic convention was really three events, each with its own atmosphere and impact, but all contributing to a single theme: The Clintons are back.

Tonight President Obama will take the stage at the Democratic National Convention with one goal: convincing voters to elect Hillary Clinton as his successor.

The stakes are high for the newly minted nominee, but they are arguably even higher for the incumbent president. A Clinton win would mean his policy legacy is kept intact and there's validation of his tenure in the White House.

President Obama likes to say he has run his last campaign. But he's determined to give Hillary Clinton a running start toward her own November election, mindful that much of his legacy depends on her crossing the finish line into the White House.

"I'm ready to pass the baton," Obama told supporters at a joint rally with Clinton in Charlotte, N.C., earlier this month. "I know she can run that race: the race to create good jobs, and better schools, and safer streets, and a safer world."

When Joe Biden takes the stage at the Democratic National Convention on Wednesday night, there is probably a part of him that still wonders, "What if?"

But his own White House dreams and reported rivalry with Hillary Clinton will have to be in the rearview mirror in order for him to deliver a home run endorsement, starting on stage and continuing through November.

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