Lead Stories

NPR Story
4:03 am
Tue March 3, 2015

Netanyahu Speech: The View From Israel

Originally published on Tue March 3, 2015 5:28 am

Copyright 2015 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

Politics
4:03 am
Tue March 3, 2015

Sen. Mikulski, In Public Office Since 1976, Won't Seek Re-Election

Originally published on Tue March 3, 2015 7:03 am

Copyright 2015 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

Shots - Health News
3:03 am
Tue March 3, 2015

What Shapes Health? Join The Discussion On Harvard's Webcast

Mitchell Funk/Getty Images

Health is more than the sum of its parts. Sometimes in surprising ways, factors such as childhood experiences, housing conditions, poor diets and health care access drive who ends up sick — and who does not.

As part of the series "What Shapes Health," created in partnership with the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation and the Harvard T.H. Chan School of Public Health, Harvard is sponsoring a webcast on Tuesday, March 3 from 12:30 to 1:30 pm EST.

To pose questions, email theforum@hsph.harvard.edu.

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Religion
2:47 am
Tue March 3, 2015

In English Town, Muslims Lead Effort To Create Interfaith Haven

A Lego model of All Souls Church rests on the altar, which was retained when the Bolton, England, church was renovated into an interfaith community center. The model was built by children taking part in an after-school program there.
Ari Shapiro NPR

Originally published on Tue March 3, 2015 9:58 am

Inayat Omarji vividly remembers the worried reaction when he first looked into renovating the abandoned church in his neighborhood: "There's a bearded young Muslim chap involved in a church! Whoops! He's gonna turn it into a mosque!"

At the time, Omarji was head of the local council of mosques, but there already were three or four in his neighborhood in Bolton, England.

"What it needed is a place where people could meet, people can come to, people can socialize," he says.

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U.S.
2:41 am
Tue March 3, 2015

States Face Correctional Officer Shortage Amid A Cultural Stigma

Corrections officer Sgt. Charles Galaviz secures an inmate for transfer with handcuffs and shackles Jan. 24 at the Lexington Assessment and Reception Center, in Lexington, Okla. Overtime is mandatory for correctional officers in the state's prisons, which have a manpower shortage of about 33 percent and the highest inmate homicide rate in the country.
Sue Ogrocki AP

Originally published on Tue March 3, 2015 9:58 am

More than 1.3 million people are incarcerated in state prisons in this country, and keeping those prisons running requires tens of thousands of corrections officers. But right now, some states are facing major staffing shortages.

Much of this shortfall is because of the strong economy, but recruiters also are struggling with the job's cultural stigma.

Cadets at Wyoming's Department of Corrections Training Academy are practicing how they'll handcuff prisoners; in a few weeks this scenario will be very real, but right now everyone is pretty relaxed.

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