#NPRreads is a weekly feature on Twitter and in The Two-Way. The premise is simple: Correspondents, editors and producers from our newsroom share the pieces that have kept them reading, using the #NPRreads hashtag. Each weekend, we highlight some of the best stories.

When the Consumer Financial Protection Bureau looked into the Mississippi-based regional bank BancorpSouth, it didn't just review thousands of loan applications. It sent in undercover operatives — some white, some black — who pretended to be customers applying for loans.

"They had similar credit scores and similar background and situations," says CFPB Director Richard Cordray. "Our investigation had found that BancorpSouth had engaged in illegal redlining in Memphis, meaning refusing to lend into specific areas of the city."

In Baton Rouge, La., people are using whatever tools they have to help their community recover from the flood.

That includes cameras.

Four photographers have been creating portraits of those affected. Their project, "Humans of the Water," focuses not on what people lost, but on what they saved.

One of those photographers is Collin Richie. He says documentary photography isn't typically his style. Most of his work involves snapping photos for weddings, magazines and corporate advertisements.

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DAVE DAVIES, HOST:

This is FRESH AIR. Barack and Michelle Obama's first date in Chicago back in 1989 is the subject of a new movie called "Southside With You." Film critic David Edelstein has a review.

Copyright 2016 Fresh Air. To see more, visit Fresh Air.

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In Zimbabwe's capital city, police fired tear gas and water cannons to disperse a demonstration that the country's top court had ruled could proceed.

Opposition leaders termed Friday's march in Harare a "mega-demonstration." It marked "the first time that Zimbabwe's fractured opposition joined in a single action to confront President Robert Mugabe's government since 2007," as The Associated Press reports.

The obscene, threatening voicemail left for Maine Rep. Drew Gattine certainly wasn't anonymous.

"Mr. Gattine, this is Gov. Paul Richard LePage," it began. ""I would like to talk to you about your comments about my being a racist, you c********r" — a vulgarity referencing fellatio.

"I want you to prove I'm a racist. I've spent my life helping black people and you little son of a bitch, socialist c********r," he continued, using the same expletive, " ... I am after you."

The California judge who is subject to a recall campaign after imposing a six-month jail sentence on a former Stanford swimmer convicted of sexual assault has been reassigned at his own request from criminal to civil court.

Aaron Persky, a Superior Court judge in Palo Alto, will move to a courthouse in downtown San Jose, effective Sept. 6.

Not 1,000. Not 50. Not even 10.

Zero.

"There have so far been no laboratory confirmed cases of Zika virus in spectators, athletes or anyone associated with the Olympics," the World Health Organization said Thursday on its website.

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Weekly Features

Events: August 26 - September 1

This weekend there's plenty to do in Waco, from the MisCast Cabaret to the 21st annual Salsa and Margarita Festival. Heading into next week you can stay busy with a documentary screening at the Hippodrome and a lecture on the history of Czech culture in Texas. You can find more things to do on this week's Act Locally Waco.
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