Lead Stories

Books
4:20 pm
Sun April 19, 2015

In Debate Over Hugo Awards, Science Fiction Community Engages With Issues Of Bias

Originally published on Sun April 19, 2015 11:18 pm

NPR's Arun Rath talks to author Monica Byrne about how controversy surrounding this year's Hugo Awards highlights a difference in how speculative and literary fiction approach diversity. "The speculative community hashes out its sexism and racism issues right on the surface, whereas the literary community has convinced itself it doesn't have any," she writes.

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Asia
4:20 pm
Sun April 19, 2015

Chinese President To Discuss Massive Trade Route During Pakistan Visit

Originally published on Sun April 19, 2015 5:33 pm

Copyright 2015 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

Author Interviews
4:20 pm
Sun April 19, 2015

Unsettling Tales Of Strange Suburbia Echo Through 'The Night'

Emily Jan NPR

Originally published on Sun April 19, 2015 7:16 pm

A town that experiences a sudden suicide epidemic, a mysterious traveling salesman who sells a magical mirror polish, a mermaid who washes up on shore: What happens to a small town when something strange and supernatural takes over?

Pulitzer Prize-winning author Steven Millhauser explores that intersection of familiar life and disturbing, often bizarre events in his new short story collection, Voices in the Night.

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The Two-Way
3:49 pm
Sun April 19, 2015

Congo Monkey Spotted Decades After Species' Alleged Demise

Mother and infant Bouvier's red colobus monkeys in a first-ever photograph of the primate taken in the Democratic Republic of Congo. The species was thought to have gone extinct in the 1970s.
Lieven Devreese and Gaël Elie Gnondo Gobolo Ntokou-Pikounda National Park, DRC

Welcome back, Bouvier's red colobus monkey. It's been a while.

The African primate hasn't been seen since the 1970s and was assumed to have become extinct.

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The Two-Way
11:49 am
Sun April 19, 2015

2 Decades Later, 168 Victims Of Oklahoma City Attack Are Remembered

Spectators bow their heads during a moment of silence during a ceremony to commemorate the 20th anniversary of the Oklahoma City bombing at the Oklahoma City National Memorial, on Sunday.
Sue Ogrocki AP

Originally published on Sun April 19, 2015 3:50 pm

Twenty years ago today, Timothy McVeigh — an Army veteran with strong anti-government views — drove a rental truck containing a massive homemade bomb up to the front of the Alfred P. Murrah Federal Building in Oklahoma City, lit the fuse and walked away.

The result was the worst act of domestic terrorism in U.S. history. It took the lives of 168 people, including many children attending a daycare in the targeted building.

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