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Peace Corps Volunteer To Have Turkey-Free But Thankful Thanksgiving

This year I'm having two Thanksgivings.But neither of them will be at home with my family. I've been in the Peace Corps since October of 2014, stationed in Ghana's Northern Region. On Thursday, I'll spend the day in northern Ghana with three friends, also Peace Corps volunteers. We plan to indulge ourselves by buying a few fried chicken legs from a roadside stand.Then on Saturday, about 16 of us volunteers will gather, cook a feast and belatedly celebrate. We won't be serving turkey, stuffing...
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For some of us, the best part of Thanksgiving comes from a forkful of flavors all swirled together — turkey, gravy, cranberry and stuffing. It's a savory symphony in your mouth.

Chefs in New York City are experimenting with putting together all of those ingredients into a one-bite Thanksgiving dinner.

A New York judge will weigh in on Wednesday whether fantasy sports is based on skill or chance.

New York's attorney general's office has filed lawsuits against the two biggest daily fantasy sports companies, FanDuel and DraftKings, demanding that they stop taking bets in New York because their games are based on chance, which makes them gambling and illegal under New York state law. Daily fantasy sports companies insist that their games are legal because they're based on skill.

Protests over racial discrimination on college campuses are leading to some swift responses and pledges of reform by college administrators. Even as the protests themselves appear to be quieting down ahead of the Thanksgiving holiday, activists are pledging a prolonged fight.

Throughout history, atrocities have been committed in the name of medical research.

Nazi doctors experimented on concentration camp prisoners. American doctors let poor black men with syphilis go untreated in the Tuskegee study. The list goes on.

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The Paris prosecutor Francois Molins said Tuesday that the man believed to have orchestrated the Paris attacks, Abdelhamid Abaaoud, had planned more attacks before he was killed by police on Nov. 18. Molins also said Abaaoud returned to the scenes of the attacks even as the horror he crafted was still unfolding.

NPR's Eleanor Beardsley reports for the Newscast unit:

"Speaking at a press conference, Molins said Abaaoud returned to the scene of the café attacks and was outside the concert hall even as SWAT teams were entering to put an end to the carnage.

The Canadian government has had to scale back ambitious plans to resettle 25,000 Syrian refugees by the end of the year.

The pledge by Canada's new prime minister, Justin Trudeau, to bring in the refugees helped sweep him to power in last month's elections. But the Paris attacks and the daunting logistics of the plan forced Canada to extend that deadline.

The government unveiled its updated plans on Tuesday. Its says it hopes to resettle 10,000 Syrian refugees by the end of the year and another 15,000 by the end of February.



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