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At 14, Jenipher Sanni married a man who already had a wife and kids. He yelled at her a lot. She dropped out of school.

Now 20, she's left her husband and is a newly minted high school graduate. And she's helping girls in her community stay in school.

In this week's edition of our education news roundup, we take you from school vouchers to AP exams to community college.

Betsy DeVos speaks to American Legislative Exchange Council

Protests greeted the education secretary in Denver this week at her speech to the American Legislative Exchange Council. Her family has close ties to the organization, which brings together state legislators, free-market conservatives and corporate sponsors to write model bills that get adopted all over the country.

NPR reporters are returning to their hometowns this summer to find out how they've changed – from job prospects to schools and how people see their community and the country.

Once home to thriving timber and fishing industries, Gold Beach, Oregon now subsists on tourists and retirees looking for a quiet beach, a nice river trip and, in a few cases, marijuana.

I left Gold Beach after graduating from high school in 1985. Back then, it was a blue-collar town dominated by the timber industry.

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An al-Qaida-linked suspect who prosecutors say conspired to murder a Swedish cartoonist has been charged in federal court in Philadelphia, despite the Trump administration's vow that alleged terrorists would be tried in military courts.

Prosecutors say Ali Charaf Damache, 52, an Algerian-born Irish citizen also known as "Black Flag," was allegedly part of an Ireland-based cell that included Colleen R. LaRose, a Pennsylvania woman known as "Jihad Jane." LaRose pled guilty in a U.S. court in 2011 to conspiracy and terrorism-related crimes. She is serving a 10-year sentence.

As general sessions judge for White County, Tenn., Sam Benningfield says the vast majority of cases he hears are drug-related offenses. The opioid epidemic has hit the state especially hard — resulting in more than 1,400 drug overdose deaths there in 2015 alone, according to the CDC — and he felt that an unusual solution would be necessary to drive home the dangers of illegal drugs for would-be parents.

As Amazon grows, so does its lobbying budget

19 hours ago

Amazon just keeps growing. So does its spending on lobbying in support of policies it thinks will aid that growth. Filings with the Securities and Exchange Commission show the company is on track to spend $12 million lobbying this year, $1 million more than it spent in 2016. What's on Amazon's wish list?

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Can the president keep his tax cut promise?

19 hours ago

This week, the House of Representatives detailed a 2018 budget plan, a first step toward a tax code overhaul. But it'll be no small lift to get to the big corporate tax cut President Trump has promised. The administration wants to lower corporate tax rates from 35 percent to 15 percent. That’s going to be expensive. 

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Today was a rare day in the red for the major indices. They were down just a little. One day, however, does not a trend make. That brings no comfort to short sellers, traders betting the markets are due for a fall. They're becoming scarce as stocks keep on going up. Ben Eisen wrote about the lack of short interest in the Wall Street Journal today and spoke with Kai Ryssdal. Below is an edited transcript of their conversation.

The U.S. Chamber of Commerce sent a shot across the bow of congressional Republicans in the form of a not-so-subtle message — don’t screw up tax cuts like you did health care reform, or else. Its letter explained that a year from now, the Chamber will be evaluating candidates based on their support for a "free enterprise system." It's a bit of an odd situation the Chamber finds itself in these days, having to twist arms when Republicans control the government. 

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There's one thing that crosses the U.S.-Mexico border everyday, although you can't always see it: water.  

Our unquenchable thirst for bottled water

19 hours ago

It's summer, it’s hot and we’re thirsty for water.

We have choices: There’s the water that’s provided for us by our local governments — tap water — and there’s the bottled water we pay for. And we pay a lot.

The American bottled water industry made nearly $16 billion in revenue last year, according to the International Bottled Water Association. Bottled water also replaced carbonated soft drinks as the largest beverage group in the country following decades of growth.

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On this program in 2014, Moziah Bridges told us about his dream.

(SOUNDBITE OF ARCHIVED BROADCAST)

MOZIAH BRIDGES: I want to bring the bow tie back, and I want to make it look better than what it used to be.

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