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As soon as Donald Trump announced that he'd gained the endorsement of 100 black ministers from across the country on Monday, there were skeptics.

The claim came just days after the presidential candidate said of an African-American Black Lives Matter protester who was beaten up at a Trump event, "Maybe he deserved to be roughed up."

Amid growing criticism, Chicago Mayor Rahm Emanuel has dismissed police Superintendent Garry McCarthy.

After announcing that he was appointing a task force to look at police accountability, Emanuel said that "public trust" in the city's police force has been "shaken" and "eroded" and so he had asked McCarthy to resign.

Kentucky Gov.-elect Matt Bevin, who takes office Dec. 8, plans to dismantle the state's successful health insurance exchange and shift consumers to the federal one. It's a campaign promise that has sparked controversy in the state.

Supporters of Kentucky's exchange, called Kynect, have asked Bevin to reconsider. They say the exchange created under Obamacare and an expansion of Medicaid have improved public health by dramatically increasing the number of Kentuckians with health coverage.

If you're a low-income woman, you're more likely to get screened for breast cancer if you live in a state that expanded Medicaid under the Affordable Care Act than in a state that didn't.

There's a place in the city of Tijuana, Mexico, called El Bordo, which has always been somewhat reminiscent of a post-apocalyptic movie scene. The name comes from "the border," which is where it's located: right by the fence that separates the U.S. from Mexico, among the enormous paved canals that run through Southern California like concrete veins. Hundreds of people live in those canals, often in makeshift tents, the smell of sewage made ripe by the hot Tijuana sun. It's a place where many deportees try to get by. It's also a site of heavy drug use.

Can the Warriors' winning streak bring in big bucks?

8 hours ago
Molly Wood and Mukta Mohan

To say that The Golden State Warriors started their season strongly would be an understatement. They’re currently on a winning streak with 19 wins and no losses, and they’re set to play again tomorrow night. If they win, they’ll tie a 131-year-old record for the longest season-opening winning streak by any professional sports team, which was set by the St. Louis Maroons baseball team in 1884. The winning streak is great news for Warriors fans but does it have a financial impact? Kenneth Shropshire of the Wharton Sports Business Initiative explains what winning streaks mean for business.

Recently, we've been talking a lot about onscreen diversity and how much browner TV has gotten in the past few years with shows like Empire, Master of None and Dr. Ken and showrunners like Shonda Rhimes and Nahnatchka Khan injecting more people of color into the system.

V-Tech hack affected millions of children — is anyone safe?

9 hours ago
Molly Wood, Bruce Johnson and Mukta Mohan

The huge hack of Hong Kong toy company V-Tech continues to spread. V-Tech said today that hackers stole information of nearly 6.5 million children who used its toys. That number is up from 200,000, which is how many kids the company said were affected when it announced the hack on Friday. Hackers also stole data from about 5 million of the children’s parents. The stolen information includes names and birth dates, and may include photos of the children and chat logs from V-Tech’s toy tablets and their parents’ phones.

In South Carolina, catastrophic rainfall is making this a grim year for one of the state's biggest industries: farming. Just when fall crops were ready to harvest, extensive flooding drowned fields and sidelined farm workers.