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The Two-Way
7:17 am
Fri April 24, 2015

Armenians Mark A Century Since World War I Massacre

Catholicos Karekin II (R, front), the supreme head of the Armenian Apostolic Church, and Russia's President Vladimir Putin walk to attend a commemoration ceremony marking the centenary of the mass killing of Armenians by Ottoman Turks in Yerevan, Armenia.
RIA Novosti Reuters/Landov

European leaders attended a ceremony marking the centenary of the massacre of an estimated 1.5 million Armenians by Ottoman Turks during World War I, as German lawmakers risked triggering a diplomatic row with Turkey by voting to acknowledge the historical event as "genocide" –- a charge Ankara has strongly denied.

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Around the Nation
6:23 am
Fri April 24, 2015

Tales Of Environmental Activism

Originally published on Fri April 24, 2015 9:24 am

Copyright 2015 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

Europe
6:23 am
Fri April 24, 2015

Lost Siblings Find Each Other On Dating App

Originally published on Fri April 24, 2015 9:24 am

Copyright 2015 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

The Two-Way
5:31 am
Fri April 24, 2015

A Century After Atrocities Against Armenians, An Unresolved Wound

Armenians were massacred by forces of the Ottoman Empire in 1915. In this instance, the heads of the victims were placed on stakes.
AP

Originally published on Fri April 24, 2015 7:38 am

This much is known: Up to 1.5 million Armenians were killed or deported in the violence unleashed by Ottoman Turks starting on April 24, 1915. But as the 100th anniversary of these events is marked on Friday, it remains a bitter source of contention between Turks and Armenians.

Armenians, along with many historians and European countries, have called it the 20th century's first genocide. Turkey suppressed accounts of the killings for decades, and to this day staunchly rejects the label of genocide.

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Code Switch
5:09 am
Fri April 24, 2015

A Look At 'Blackbird,' The First Film On The New 'Black Netflix'

Blackbird is about a gay interracial romance set in the deep South.
courtesy of blackbirdthemovie.com

Originally published on Fri April 24, 2015 9:59 am

A tiny independent movie has been picked by one of Hollywood's biggest moguls to promote his latest venture. Robert L. Johnson created BET and now, the Urban Movie Channel — an online channel that's being called the black Netflix.

The first original film it has acquired is a gay interracial romance set in the Deep South. In Blackbird, the main character Randy is in high school. Everyone thinks he's gay, and they're totally fine with it.

Randy, 18, is fervently religious. Even though his best friend is gay, Randy's in denial about his own sexuality.

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