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If fashion is art, Sonia Rykiel is considered a master. Women's Wear Daily dubbed her the "queen of knitwear" — though she was the first to admit she didn't know how to knit — and her designs have been shown in museums. Rykiel, who had Parkinson's disease, died Thursday morning at her home in Paris. She was 86.

Here at Goats and Soda, we are always on the prowl for breaking goat news. And this week was a good week for goats.

Goats to the rescue

If the popularity of quinoa has taught us anything, it's that Americans are increasingly open about exploring grains besides the familiar wheat and rice. Now, researchers at Tennessee State University are hoping consumers are ready to give another ancient grain a try: amaranth.

Amaranth was revered by the Aztecs in Mexico. Today in the U.S., it's mostly grown in people's backyards or on research farms, like an experimental field at Tennessee State University.

Frank Ocean and the business of really fancy music videos

Aug 25, 2016
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Kai Ryssdal and Bridget Bodnar

Earlier this week, Frank Ocean released 17 songs as part of a new album, Blonde – his first in four years. But in the style a la Beyonce and Lemonade, Ocean also released a visual album called “Endless”…oh, an also, an oversized art magazine called “Boys Don’t Cry.” Multiple pop-up shops appeared in New York, Los Angeles, Chicago, and London.

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Kai Ryssdal

Update: According to the Associated Press, authorities in Rio are charging Lochte with making a false robbery report.

Ryan Lochte lost all his big sponsorship deals after his idiocy down in Brazil during the Olympics. Today, you might say he's failing upward, or something.

What's behind Uber's $1.2 billion loss

Aug 25, 2016

You know what's worse than losing a million dollars? Losing a billion dollars.

But a report today says Uber managed to lose a billion dollars in just the first half of this year.

The Bloomberg report also says Uber isn't profitable in the U.S. this quarter, in part because of its ongoing price battles with rival Lyft.

Kai Ryssdal spoke with Marketplace's senior tech correspondent Molly Wood to see what's behind the loss. 

The Pain Of Police Killings Can Last Decades

Aug 25, 2016

In recent months, the nation has witnessed how questionable police shootings of African Americans can spark anger and unrest across a community. But long after the demonstrations end, the streets go quiet and the cameras leave, families of those killed have to find ways to cope with their loss. And that's a private struggle that can last for decades and across generations.

Cordero Ducksworth has lived that struggle. He was 5 years old in 1962, when his father, Army Corporal Roman Ducksworth, Jr., was shot to death by William Kelly, a white Taylorsville, Miss. police officer.

When Save the Children Australia signed up to help migrants that Australia was detaining on the remote island of Nauru, workers for the aid group had to sign confidentiality agreements.

One of the group's former workers, Victoria Vibhakar, told NPR on Wednesday that as a result, abuse, including the abuse of children, was largely ignored.

Like any business, revenue drop hurts RNC

Aug 25, 2016
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Kim Adams

The Republican National Committee has had one of its worst fundraising months in recent years. There are many theories as to why: the candidate, the media, the donors, and more.

But no matter the reason, the truth is that the RNC is like any business; when there's less money coming in, there's less business it can do. That means fewer voter registration drives, fewer ads, and less staff support for the campaign of the party's presidential nominee — this election, that's Donald Trump.

After signaling that his position on immigration is "to be determined" and that it could "soften," Donald Trump did an amazing thing — what amounts to almost a full about-face on the principal issue that has driven his campaign.

Trump indicated in a town hall with Fox News' Sean Hannity, which aired Wednesday night, that he would be in favor of a path to legalization for immigrants in the U.S. illegally.

Could we have prevented Zika?

Aug 25, 2016
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Kai Ryssdal

Seems like there’s a new scary disease every year—two years ago Ebola’s hemorrhagic fever and this year Zika’s misshapen baby heads. Zoonotic diseases like these have cost the world billions of dollars and millions of lives.  Earlier this month, the CDC issued its first travel warning in the continental U.S for mosquito-born Zika in Miami Florida.

From Texas Standard:

Earlier this week, a federal judge sided with Texas' request to block a federal directive for schools to accommodate the bathroom choices of transgender students. Attorney General Ken Paxton said he was pleased – but not surprised – by the court's order, and subsequently filed suit to remove discrimination protections against health insurers.

The Human Rights Campaign, among others, blasted that move as shameful, cheap and political. Others have been far more harsh in their assessments – both of Paxton and Texas Lt. Gov. Dan Patrick, who says he's not sure he's ever known a transgender person.

 


Hiromi Yamamiro is doing something that's relatively rare in Japan. At age 67, he's still working in the corporate world, where traditionally, the mandatory retirement age has been 60.

But Yamamiro keeps going, because he loves his job — which he's been doing for 18 years — selling environmentally friendly products at Tokyo-based Sato Holdings.

"We're developing new products every single day," he says. "Plus the purpose is to create an environmentally friendly world. And it's just so much fun!"

Marketplace for Thursday, August 25, 2016

Aug 25, 2016
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Marketplace

Uber posted second quarter losses exceeding $100 million; The CEO of Mylan attributes the cost of EpiPens increasing by 500 percent to a dysfunctional healthcare system; and we examine the mini-trend of artists like Beyonce and Frank Ocean releasing visual albums.

More than a day after a powerful earthquake struck central Italy, rescue teams are desperately searching for survivors in the rubble of once-charming mountain towns.

At least 241 people died in the disaster, according to civil protection officials, The Associated Press reports. Many of the devastated communities are difficult to reach, and the exact number of missing persons isn't known.

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