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An ISIS-claimed car bomb exploded near the Syrian town of al-Bab, killing at least 51 people in an area that Turkish-backed rebels recently seized from Islamic State militants.

At least 34 of those killed were civilians, according to the Syrian Observatory for Human Rights, a British-based monitoring group. Witnesses told Reuters that the bomb went off in the village of Sousian, five miles north of al-Bab, at a rebel checkpoint crowded with people who had fled the fighting and were preparing to return to their homes.

Copyright 2017 Fresh Air. To see more, visit Fresh Air.

DAVID BIANCULLI, HOST:

Copyright 2017 Fresh Air. To see more, visit Fresh Air.

DAVID BIANCULLI, HOST:

Copyright 2017 Fresh Air. To see more, visit Fresh Air.

DAVID BIANCULLI, HOST:

Should you be worried about a data bug named Cloudbleed?

Feb 24, 2017
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Bruce Johnson and Marketplace staff

One frame from a video, a few words from a private message — these are the types of fragments that were leaked because of a glitch in the code of Cloudflare, the widespread internet security and website delivery service.

Today, two table tennis pros met at the Qatar Open and ended up locked in a staggering 10-minute, 766-shot rally.

The International Table Tennis Federation, which runs the event, said in an Instagram video that it "has got to be the longest rally ever in modern table tennis history!"

Yayoi Kusama exhibit is an economic puzzle for museum

Feb 24, 2017
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Mark Garrison

What may be the most anticipated art exhibition of the year opened Thursday at the Smithsonian’s Hirshhorn Museum and Sculpture Garden in Washington, D.C. Record crowds are expected to see the work of Yayoi Kusama, that rare kind of living artist who draws in collectors, critics and casual fans by the millions. Even a single piece of her work has been enough to inspire fans to line up around the block. And now the Smithsonian has an entire exhibition.

Waymo, the company that began as Google's self-driving-car project, is suing Uber — alleging that when Uber bought a startup founded by Waymo veterans, it also bought thousands of design files that had been inappropriately downloaded from its servers.

In its lawsuit, Waymo cites forensic evidence as well as a vendor's email that it received by mistake.

Copyright 2017 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

STEVE INSKEEP, HOST:

President Trump addressed the conservative conference known as CPAC this morning.

(SOUNDBITE OF SPEECH)

PRESIDENT DONALD TRUMP: Great to be back at CPAC.

(CHEERING)

TRUMP: It's a place I have really...

UNIDENTIFIED SUPPORTER: We love you.

From humble origins as the daughter of Eastern European immigrants, raised in the Bronx in the depths of the Great Depression, Mildred Dresselhaus scaled to great heights in the scientific community and attained the status of royalty — even if only in nickname.

Many studies designed to try out new drugs simply languish. They don't attract enough patients, and they aren't completed. That slows medical progress.

But here's a story of one study that has bucked that trend — in fact, it is so popular, scientists had to put the brakes on it for a while.

The White House is admitting that it discussed with the FBI media reports that Trump campaign officials were in contact with Russian intelligence agents and that Chief of Staff Reince Priebus asked the FBI to publicly knock down the story.

FBI Director James Comey refused.

02/24/17: Encore, encore, encore!

Feb 24, 2017
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Marketplace

Since Lizzie is reporting from Wyoming, we’re revisiting some of our favorite stories from the recent past. We revisit the question “Can your office make you sick?” We’re not necessarily saying “yes,” but we’re most definitely not saying “no” either. We also listen back on an interview with Emily Weiss, the CEO of Glossier, one of the hottest beauty products brands among millennials. 

If you’ve been paying attention the last couple days to the Conservative Political Action Conference in Washington, D.C., you’ve heard a consistent thread of regaining economic control. From the president to his key strategist Steve Bannon on down, there’s talk of claiming once again what Bannon calls “sovereignty.” Which, of course, implies America had lost it. But sovereignty isn’t just at the center of this administration’s worldview. It has currency on the political left as well as across the pond in Europe.

Last year, the Obama administration announced it was going to phase out federal government use of private prisons after reports surfaced of safety and security issues. Yesterday, that plan was overturned by the new attorney general, Jeff Sessions. The news immediately boosted share prices of the two largest companies that run private prisons. With the Trump administration’s crackdown on undocumented immigration creating thousands of detainees, all signs suggest it's a growth industry.

Click the audio player above for the full story. 

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