Mose Buchele

Mose Buchele is the Austin-based broadcast reporter for KUT's NPR partnership StateImpact Texas . He has been on staff at KUT 90.5  since 2009, covering local and state issues.  Mose has also worked as a blogger on politics and an education reporter at his hometown paper in Western Massachusetts. He holds masters degrees in Latin American Studies and Journalism from UT Austin.

Ilana Panich-Linsman/KUT

A military training exercise called “Operation Jade Helm” starts today across the country and in Bastrop. Military exercises happen all the time.  But this one gained a lot of attention when conspiracy theorists started protesting it, calling it part of a takeover by sinister forces in the Government. Those voices grew so loud that Texas Governor Greg Abbot even decided to send in state observers to monitor the operation.  So KUT’s Mose Buchele visited Bastrop to see how people there were feeling about the operation. 

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A Spanish-based wind power company is coming to Texas. The company G-R-I will build a 41 million dollar plant in Amarillo. As KUT’s Mose Buchele reports for StateImpact Texas, the announcement is good news for an industry that recently felt itself under threat by state lawmakers.


By now, the surprise of cheap gas has probably worn off.

But drivers on the hunt for the very best prices have noticed a new trend: Small, independent gas stations are often the first to cut prices when the price of crude oil falls. This has a lot to do with how gas is bought, sold and moved from pipeline to pump.

A Christmas tree strapped to the roof of a car, or shimmering in a cheerfully decorated living room is a common sight this time of year.  The USDA estimates the Christmas tree industry to be a $14.5 billion enterprise. While states like Oregon, North Carolina and Michigan lead in harvests, a new USDA survey shows Central Texas leads the state in production, but where are those trees coming from?

Officials from countries around the word have met for the last two weeks in Lima, Peru to talk global climate change.   At the heart of those talks is how to limit billions of tons of CO2 that are pumped into the atmosphere every year from coal burning power plants.  

But how do we keep track of the CO2 we’re releasing? And just how do we weigh something that floats in the first place? 

It turns out there is a venerable history to the science of weighing smoke.

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