Mose Buchele

Mose Buchele is the Austin-based broadcast reporter for KUT's NPR partnership StateImpact Texas . He has been on staff at KUT 90.5  since 2009, covering local and state issues.  Mose has also worked as a blogger on politics and an education reporter at his hometown paper in Western Massachusetts. He holds masters degrees in Latin American Studies and Journalism from UT Austin.

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Texas News
3:07 pm
Wed June 17, 2015

Spanish Wind Company Coming to Texas

https://www.flickr.com/photos/a4gpa/ (CC BY-SA 2.0)

A Spanish-based wind power company is coming to Texas. The company G-R-I will build a 41 million dollar plant in Amarillo. As KUT’s Mose Buchele reports for StateImpact Texas, the announcement is good news for an industry that recently felt itself under threat by state lawmakers.


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Your Money
5:28 pm
Tue February 3, 2015

Looking For Even Cheaper Gas? Go Generic At An Indie Station

Traffic moves along Route 21 in downtown Newark, N.J., where a gas station lists the price for regular unleaded gasoline at $1.72.
Julio Cortez AP

Originally published on Tue February 10, 2015 1:44 pm

By now, the surprise of cheap gas has probably worn off.

But drivers on the hunt for the very best prices have noticed a new trend: Small, independent gas stations are often the first to cut prices when the price of crude oil falls. This has a lot to do with how gas is bought, sold and moved from pipeline to pump.

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Texas News
3:57 pm
Tue December 23, 2014

Where Are All of Texas' Christmas Trees Coming From?

Bastrop County produced the most Christmas trees in Texas last year, but the industry in Texas is still dwarfed by states like North Carolina and Oregon.
Via, flickr.com/photos/aquariawintersoul

Originally published on Mon December 22, 2014 12:14 pm

A Christmas tree strapped to the roof of a car, or shimmering in a cheerfully decorated living room is a common sight this time of year.  The USDA estimates the Christmas tree industry to be a $14.5 billion enterprise. While states like Oregon, North Carolina and Michigan lead in harvests, a new USDA survey shows Central Texas leads the state in production, but where are those trees coming from?

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Science and the Environment
5:11 pm
Fri December 12, 2014

CO2 and the History of Weighing Smoke

The science of weighing carbon gas is tied to Sir Walter Raleigh's attempt to weigh smoke after a wager with Queen Elizabeth I.
Courtesy of Louis Vest, flickr.com/photos/oneeighteen

Originally published on Fri December 12, 2014 11:36 am

Officials from countries around the word have met for the last two weeks in Lima, Peru to talk global climate change.   At the heart of those talks is how to limit billions of tons of CO2 that are pumped into the atmosphere every year from coal burning power plants.  

But how do we keep track of the CO2 we’re releasing? And just how do we weigh something that floats in the first place? 

It turns out there is a venerable history to the science of weighing smoke.

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Science and the Environment
2:04 pm
Tue November 25, 2014

How Underground Sensors in Texas Will Help NASA Predict Drought and Floods

Soil moisture meters across the state could one day help predict weather patterns across the state.
Photo courtesy of Richard Casteel

Originally published on Tue November 25, 2014 11:22 am

From StateImpact Texas:

Stanley Rabke’s family has lived and worked on their Hill Country ranch since 1889. Generations of Rabkes have struggled with the extremes of Texas weather, but one storm sticks out in Stanley’s memory: it came after the drought of the 1950s.

“It rained and rained and rained,” he says. “Back then we raised turkeys, we lost thousands of turkeys that washed away in the creek.”

The disaster underscores an irony of life in Texas. “You hope and pray that you’re going to get a good rain, [but] on the other side of it, you hope you don’t get a flood,” says Rabke.

A quick walk from where the turkeys met their fate, some new technology that will help manage that risk is being installed — soil monitoring sensors in the ground.

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