Scott Neuman

Scott Neuman works as a Digital News writer and editor, handling breaking news and feature stories for NPR.org. Occasionally he can be heard on-air reporting on stories for Newscasts and has done several radio features since he joined NPR in April 2007, as an editor on the Continuous News Desk.

Neuman brings to NPR years of experience as an editor and reporter at a variety of news organizations and based all over the world. For three years in Bangkok, Thailand, he served as an Associated Press Asia-Pacific desk editor. From 2000-2004, Neuman worked as a Hong Kong-based Asia editor and correspondent for The Wall Street Journal. He spent the previous two years as the international desk editor at the AP, while living in New York.

As the United Press International's New Delhi-based correspondent and bureau chief, Neuman covered South Asia from 1995-1997. He worked for two years before that as a freelance radio reporter in India, filing stories for NPR, PRI and the Canadian Broadcasting System. In 1991, Neuman was a reporter at NPR Member station WILL in Champaign-Urbana, IL. He started his career working for two years as the operations director and classical music host at NPR member station WNIU/WNIJ in DeKalb/Rockford, IL.

Reporting from Pakistan immediately following the September 11, 2001 attacks, Neuman was part of the team that earned the Pulitzer Prize awarded to The Wall Street Journal for overall coverage of 9/11 and the aftermath. Neuman shared in several awards won by AP for coverage of the December 2004 Asian tsunami.

A graduate from Purdue University, Neuman earned a Bachelor's degree in communications and electronic journalism.

A 16-year-old boy sneaked past security guards in the middle of the night and made his way to the top of Manhattan's 1 World Trade Center, where he

Two of the most advanced maritime surveillance aircraft are being pressed into service to search for possible wreckage from Malaysia Airlines Flight 370 in the middle of the Indian Ocean.

When Vladimir Putin announced the Kremlin's annexation of Crimea this week, he made it clear that the region's large Russian-speaking population made the move necessary and inevitable.

In fact, large populations of Russian speakers are common along the fringes of the old Soviet Union. Those groups are made up of a combination of indigenous people and Russians who migrated from the mother country, many as part of Soviet-era policies aimed at altering the ethnic makeup in potentially troublesome satellites.

Sulaiman Abu Ghaith, Osama bin Laden's son-in-law, took the stand in his trial in New York on Wednesday, telling the jury that he warned the al-Qaida leader that America would "not settle until it kills you."

In the surprise testimony, Abu Ghaith recalled a conversation with bin Laden in a cave in Afghanistan after the Sept. 11, 2001, attacks.

"Did you learn what happened? We are the ones who did it," Ghaith recalled, through an Arabic interpreter, his infamous father-in-law asking.

Hoping to foil counterfeiters, Britain's Royal Mint is planning to introduce a new £1 coin that's described as the most secure in the world.

As British Chancellor George Osborne explained to Parliament on Wednesday, "the £1 coin has become increasingly susceptible to forgery" — noting that 1 in 30 of the £1 coins currently in circulation are fakes. The BBC reports that an estimated 45 million forgeries are in circulation.

An analysis of DNA from chicken bones collected in the South Pacific appears to dispel a long-held theory that the ubiquitous bird first arrived in South America aboard an ancient Polynesian seafarer's ocean-going outrigger.

Chechen separatist leader Doku Umarov, whose attacks on Russian civilians earned him the nickname "Russia's Bin Laden," is dead, according to an insurgency website.

However, it's worth noting that this is not the first time Umarov's death has been announced.

The BBC reports via Kavkaz Center, the main website of Russia's Islamic militants, that Umarov "became a martyr," but had no further details.

When the news of a lifetime finally arrived at their door, Stanford physicist Andrei Linde and his wife wondered aloud if one of them was expecting a delivery.

Khalid Sheikh Mohammed, the self-described mastermind of the Sept. 11, 2001, terrorist attacks, made a submission to federal court in Manhattan on behalf of Osama bin Laden's son-in-law, who is on trial there. Sulaiman Abu Ghaith is "an eloquent, spellbinding speaker," but he did not have any prior knowledge of al-Qaida operations, Mohammed said.

As we reported earlier this month on the first day of Abu Ghaith's trial:

The disappearance of Malaysia Airlines Flight MH370 has spawned the largest-ever multinational air-sea search — involving ships, airplanes from at least 14 countries and requests for radar information from as many as 26.

The nature of the search, in which such an enormous stretch of the globe is being scoured, is also equally unprecedented, officials say.

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