Business Review

Thursday 7:43am, 4:48pm and 6:45pm
  • Hosted by CJ Jackson

Each week the award-winning Business Review has the latest in business trends and research -- both nationally and globally. The program has received the prestigious Communicator Award for three consecutive years (2014, 2013, and 2012.)

Hosted by CJ Jackson, it's written and produced by Jessica Denk and is a production of KWBU-FM, Livingston+McKay LLC and the Hankamer School of Business at Baylor University.

American executives are spending a lot of time in ineffective meetings. Here are some tips to achieve effective collaboration and high-quality decision making by adjusting how teams handle meetings.
 (*ENCORE)


Practical ways to begin rewiring your brain to be happy, which will fuel success.


Investing in women -- especially those who are in developing countries -- leads to larger economic returns, says one former U.S. Ambassador. It leads to better communities, better families, a better country and a better economy. (*ENCORE)


Marketing professor Bill Weeks identifies what drives work performance, as well as commitment to an organization. 


According to new research, workplace incivility can stretch far beyond company walls. Assistant professor of management Merideth Ferguson says the cumulative effect of workplace stress can become viral.

 


In today's multicultural marketplace, brands are using subtle cues and visual diversity to facilitate messaging where groups aren't well defined. 


Assistant professor of management and entrepreneurship, Steve Bradley, studies the success and failure of start-ups. While conventional wisdom says the more money the better, surprisingly, Bradley's research shows that sometimes having too many resources can be a bad thing. 


Over the next five years companies will see a fairly substantial exodus of baby boomers from their workforce. Successful internships play an increasingly vital part in recruitment. The more "real life" the work is, the better, says Dr. Andrea Dixon.

 (*ENCORE)


Information security expert Bryan Palma poses sober questions about ethical boundaries in the cyber world. Who is responsible for protecting your privacy online? Palma says it's up to you. 


What motivates workers to break the rules? 


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