Business Review

Thursday 7:43am, 4:48pm and 6:45pm
  • Hosted by CJ Jackson

Each week the award-winning Business Review has the latest in business trends and research -- both nationally and globally. The program has received the prestigious Communicator Award for three consecutive years (2014, 2013, and 2012.)

Hosted by CJ Jackson, it's written and produced by Jessica Denk and is a production of KWBU-FM, Livingston+McKay LLC and the Hankamer School of Business at Baylor University.

Make strategic planning more relevant and successful. Don't focus on the planning document. It's about the team and creating a culture of excitement that produces innovation and drives a company toward high performance.  (*ENCORE)


Shawn Achor researches how people can rewire their brain to be happier.  He says there are two things that accelerate the brain toward growth, the perception of progress and the seeing the finish line as being close.


Finding patterns, then targeting customers with specificity can increase a loyal longevity of clientele. (*ENCORE)

Serial entrepreneur Kevin Rustagi reveals the difference perseverance and passion play in achieving long-term goals.


By allowing worker’s personal lives into the workplace, businesses are seeing an uptick in added value. (*ENCORE)


American executives are spending a lot of time in ineffective meetings. Here are some tips to achieve effective collaboration and high-quality decision making by adjusting how teams handle meetings.
 (*ENCORE)


Practical ways to begin rewiring your brain to be happy, which will fuel success.


Investing in women -- especially those who are in developing countries -- leads to larger economic returns, says one former U.S. Ambassador. It leads to better communities, better families, a better country and a better economy. (*ENCORE)


Marketing professor Bill Weeks identifies what drives work performance, as well as commitment to an organization. 


According to new research, workplace incivility can stretch far beyond company walls. Assistant professor of management Merideth Ferguson says the cumulative effect of workplace stress can become viral.

 


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