Marketplace

Weekdays 6pm
  • Hosted by Kai Ryssdal

Award-winning Marketplace is public radio's daily magazine on business and economics news "for the rest of us."  Hosted by Kai Ryssdal, award-winning Marketplace is public radio's daily magazine of business and economics. Marketplace takes a fresh approach to business news covering  listeners from wallet to Wall Street. 

The Hankamer School of Business at Baylor University and Mc Lane Intelligent Solutions are local sponsors of Marketplace on KWBU.

For program sponsorship information, contact Bill Leek at 254-710-4472.

(Markets Edition) The markets keep hitting new highs. Is this bullish sentiment or are actual profits pushing these stock prices? Susan Schmidt from Westwood Holdings Group stopped by to discuss earnings season, in which the big banks have reported better-than-expected earnings. Afterwards, we'll go back 30 years to revisit the markets when they weren't doing so well. On Oct. 19, 1987, the stock market suffered its biggest single-day drop in U.S. history, and it turns out that in 2017, our regulatory system and circuit breakers might not be enough to prevent a similar decline.

Tim O'Reilly, founder and CEO of O'Reilly Media, says financial markets are almost like rogue artificial intelligence, but it doesn't have to be that way. Then: FCC Chairman Ajit Pai finally says no, you actually can't take away a broadcast license (Mr. President). Finally, "The Lego Ninjago Movie" producer Daniel Lin answers our Make Me Smart question. 

(U.S. Edition) President Xi Jinping delivered a big speech today to kick off China’s Communist Party Congress, which happens twice a decade. We'll look at the economic policies Jinping is expected to focus on during the event. Afterwards, we'll speak with author Diana Henriques about Black Monday, the stock market's biggest single-day drop in U.S. history. She shares some of the lessons that America still needs to learn from that event. 

Xi urges stronger Chinese stand against "grim" challenges

5 hours ago

BEIJING (AP) — Chinese President Xi Jinping on Wednesday urged a reinvigorated Communist Party to take on a more forceful role in society and economic development to better address "grim'' challenges facing the country as he opened a twice-a-decade national congress.

Speaking in the massive Great Hall of the People near Tiananmen Square, Xi laid out his vision of a ruling party that serves as the vanguard on everything from defending national security to providing moral guidance to ordinary Chinese.

Here's why we shouldn't forget about the crash of '87

6 hours ago

On Oct. 19, 1987, the stock market dropped 22.6 percent.

In other words, that's twice as bad as the worst day of 1929, worse than any single day in 2008 and the equivalent to the Dow dropping 5,000 points now.  

10/18/2017: A 'new era' for China's economy

6 hours ago

(Global Edition) From the BBC World Service ... Revitalizing the Chinese economy has been a key part of President Xi Jinping’s leadership, but some say those efforts have come up short. Can his promise of a “new era” in Chinese politics fire up the nation’s growth engine? Afterwards, we’ll discuss the rural and urban divide in Shanghai and why upward mobility is so difficult to achieve there.

10/18/2017: Imagining romance with a robot

6 hours ago

Ever since we started imagining robots, we’ve pictured them looking like humans. There are researchers who think androids are going to a part of our future. They’re developing robots that could become our caretakers, best friends and maybe even our lovers. Marketplace Tech’s Molly Wood talks with author Alex Mar, who profiled a designer who studies human intimacy and interaction with robots.

China wants nothing to do with America's trash

20 hours ago

America is known for it's large trade deficit with China. But the United States does have a surplus of one particularly smelly export — trash. Erica Phillips of the Wall Street Journal wrote about this unusual trading relationship in her piece "Oh, Scrap: China, the Biggest Buyer of America’s Trash, Wants No More." Erica talked with Marketplace host Kai Ryssdal about China's changing attitude towards American scrap.  

10/17/2017: China's done doing our recycling

Oct 17, 2017

At America's largest ports in Los Angeles and Long Beach, bales of plastic and paper are piling up. Once upon a time, they would have been packed and shipped to Asia, where they'd be turned into consumer goods and shipped back. But China has plenty of its own recycled materials now to sustain the manufacturing of goods, leaving the U.S. with a big problem: where's it all going to go?

The economics of future technology ... explained with comics

Oct 17, 2017

We're going to take a detour here to the not-too-distant future to see what technologies might shake up the economy and help determine the future of our species. Kelly Weinersmith is a biologist and her husband, Zach, does comics, "Saturday Morning Breakfast Cereal" among them. Their new book is called "Soonish: Ten Emerging Technologies That'll Improve and/or Ruin Everything." It's sort of a layman's explainer mashed up with a comic book.

How much are 50,000 Amazon HQ2 jobs worth?

Oct 17, 2017

Call it "enticing" or "incentivizing." Call it "begging" or "groveling." What’s clear is the bidding war between cities and states to host Amazon's second national headquarters is racing to its deadline Thursday. The offers of tax incentives, subsidies, favorable zoning, job training and all the rest are piling in. A few billion here, a few more billion there. Amazon promises to bring with it 50,000 mid- to high-paying central-office jobs and a whole lot of steel and glass square footage. But how much are 50,000 jobs really worth?

The contentious fourth round of NAFTA negotiations concluded in Washington, D.C. today without a deal in sight. Trade reps from Canada and Mexico rejected outright a number of hard-line protectionist policies proposed by U.S. negotiators, proposals which Canada's Foreign Affairs Minister Chrystia Freeland described diplomatically today as "unconventional." Could these seemingly irreconcilable sticking points on President Donald Trump's bold trade agenda derail NAFTA altogether? 

Click the audio player above to hear the full story.

Work comes with rules; what to wear, how much vacation you can take, how to behave and in some cases what you can post on social media.

10/17/2017: A pretty good earnings season

Oct 17, 2017

(Markets Edition) Earnings season is looking good so far. Wall Street banks Goldman Sachs and Morgan Stanley have reported better-than-expected earnings. David Kelly, chief global strategist for JP Morgan Funds, joined us to talk about some of the factors fueling their success. Next, we'll discuss the Senate's expected vote this week on a budget resolution whose outcome is hard to predict. And finally, we'll look at America's growing shift to electric homes. 

 

What happened to the GOP’s deficit hawks?

Oct 17, 2017

The Senate is pushing ahead on a budget vote this week. That framework would move the GOP a step closer to the tax overhaul it has promised. The Senate plan allows for as much as $1.5 trillion in tax cuts over the decade. Those cuts could blow a $2.4 trillion hole in the budget, the nonpartisan Tax Policy Center estimates. There are a few on the right who are sounding the alarm about national deficits and debt. Republican Sen. Rand Paul in an interview today said he is prepared to vote no on the budget if leaders don't agree to cut billions in spending from the plan.

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