Marketplace

Weekdays 6pm
  • Hosted by Kai Ryssdal

Award-winning Marketplace is public radio's daily magazine on business and economics news "for the rest of us."  Hosted by Kai Ryssdal, award-winning Marketplace is public radio's daily magazine of business and economics. Marketplace takes a fresh approach to business news covering  listeners from wallet to Wall Street. 

The Hankamer School of Business at Baylor University and Mc Lane Intelligent Solutions are local sponsors of Marketplace on KWBU.

For program sponsorship information, contact Bill Leek at 254-710-4472.

(Markets Edition) The International Monetary Fund — which gets called to the rescue when economies melt down — meets in Washington. We'll talk to Diane Swonk, chief economist at the firm Grant Thornton, about one especially big worry that's looming: world debt. And the leader of that happens to be the U.S. Afterwards, we'll look at why rivals Amazon and Best Buy are partnering to sell televisions, and then we'll explore how a rise in trawlers off the coast of Senegal is causing local fishermen to lose their livelihoods.

Amazon and Best Buy are partnering to sell televisions. As part of the deal, Best Buy will sell Amazon smart TVs in their stores and on Amazon as a third-party merchant. What’s bringing two apparent rivals together to sell expensive gadgets to consumers?

Click the audio player above to hear the full story. 

With the weekly jobless claims out Thursday, we look at whether the tight labor market is creating opportunities for younger workers. Are employers more willing to look at — and train — younger workers? And are young workers prepared for the jobs that are available?

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(U.S. Edition) Central bankers and finance ministers from around the world are in Washington this week for the International Monetary Fund and World Bank's annual spring meeting. We'll look at some of the major concerns likely to be addressed, which include government debt.

(Global Edition) From the BBC World Service … New leadership in Zimbabwe hasn’t brought a new economic reality. This week, thousands of nurses went on strike and they’re threatening legal action if they aren’t reinstated. Then, a changing of the guard in Cuba and the first time in decades a Castro won’t be at the nation’s helm. But what does it mean for the country’s citizens and economic well-being? 

Many Americans rely on a cable provider to connect them to broadband internet, and streaming and other tech trends are changing the way we watch television. Marketplace Tech host Molly Wood spoke with Amanda Lotz about her new book, "We Now Disrupt This Broadcast," on the role of cable and the internet in transforming the way we are entertained.    

 

Why cutting the cord isn't so easy in the U.S.

9 hours ago

TV is changing all around us. Just last week, ESPN, a pillar of cable subscription bundles, launched its own streaming service, ESPN Plus. It’s just part of how streaming and other tech trends are changing the way we watch television. Old-fashioned cable subscriptions meanwhile seem like something out of "Land of the Lost." Given all that, it’s easy to forget that just a few years ago, the big disruptor in the TV industry was cable.

Is Instagram a healthier Facebook?

21 hours ago

Facebook's data breach scandal  has turned off many of its users. But for Instagram, a company Facebook bought in 2012, the impact is almost minimal. Essentially the same company, Instagram seems to distance itself from Facebook — and it's working out pretty well.

Stock buybacks are crazy right now. Here’s why.

21 hours ago

Goldman Sachs reported sharply higher profit this week, and yet its shares fell after Goldman said it wouldn’t be buying back stocks in the second quarter. In this respect, Goldman is an outlier. After the corporate tax rate dropped this year, American companies have been using cash to repurchase their own shares in furious fashion.

Click the audio player above to hear the full story. 

The upside of multilateral trade deals

21 hours ago

President Donald Trump has again rejected the idea of the U.S. joining the Trans-Pacific Partnership. That’s the multilateral trade pact the Obama administration hammered out. Yesterday, the president tweeted that he still doesn't like the TPP. He added that bilateral trade agreements, between the U.S. and just one other country, are more "efficient" and "profitable." But, are they? 

Click the audio player above to hear the full story. 

In a lot of restaurants in this country, Maine lobster is the luxury version of a luxury product. You get it in places with white table cloths and shiny silverware. But in Maine, where Jim Tselikis and Sabin Lomac grew up, lobster was eaten off paper plates at family gatherings in Jim's backyard. Six years and a couple of appearances on "Shark Tank" after the cousins sold their first Maine lobster roll off a food truck in Los Angeles, they’ve got a national lobster franchise with 20 trucks in 13 cities and a couple of brick-and-mortar restaurants as well.

A food truck business that sells a "uniquely Main moment"

23 hours ago

Cousins Jim Tselikis and Sabin Lomac were thrilled to find a large crowd when they parked their truck on their first day of business in 2012. Then they realized they were customers, and they had kept them waiting.

The following is an excerpt from their book "Cousins Maine Lobster: How One Food Truck Became a Multi-Million Dollar Business," where they discuss how they went from opening a food truck to receiving a phone call from the folks at "Shark Tank," the ABC TV show where entrepreneurs try to gain investors.   

04/18/2018: Did you go to Starbucks today?

Apr 18, 2018

American consumers can be a fickle bunch, and companies spend billions to make that fickleness break their way as best they can — especially in a crisis. Bloomberg calculated that Starbucks' upcoming shutdown for racial bias training is gonna cost $17 million in lost sales. But what do Starbucks customers think of last weekend's incident in Philadelphia, where two black men sat down without buying anything and left in handcuffs? That's where we're starting today. Then, another Trump tweet fact check: Are bilateral trade deals really better for the U.S.

In 2012, filmmaker Hajar al-Naim, 28, set foot in her first movie theater in Los Angeles more than 8,000 miles from her home in Saudi Arabia.

"I watched 'Argo,' it was ... amazing. I didn't know it would be such an experience. But I loved it because of the reaction of the people around me. The laughter, the crying, the silence in the room. It was just an incredible experience. I can't forget that day," she recalled in December when Saudi Arabia announced it was lifting a 35-year ban on cinemas.

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