Marketplace

Weekdays 6pm
  • Hosted by Kai Ryssdal

Award-winning Marketplace is public radio's daily magazine on business and economics news "for the rest of us."  Hosted by Kai Ryssdal, award-winning Marketplace is public radio's daily magazine of business and economics. Marketplace takes a fresh approach to business news covering  listeners from wallet to Wall Street. 

The Hankamer School of Business at Baylor University and Mc Lane Intelligent Solutions are local sponsors of Marketplace on KWBU.

For program sponsorship information, contact Bill Leek at 254-710-4472.

Most credit card users these days want something back – like points, miles or money.

“People of all shapes and sizes, all income levels, they all prefer cash back for their credit card rewards,” said Matt Schulz, with Creditcards.com. He said store cards can’t compete with perks from cards like Visa and American Express, which are in an arms race of rewards.

A big date on the economic calendar this week: the Federal Reserve’s Open Market Committee meeting Dec. 12 and 13. We’ll find out Wednesday whether it’s raising short-term interest rates again. An important piece of the economic puzzle landed on today with the November jobs report. It showed unemployment at a low 4.1 percent and middling wage growth — just 2.5 percent year-over-year.

(U.S. Edition) The first-ever Bitcoin futures began trading last night, which saw big price swings within minutes. On today's show, discuss what futures trading means for the cryptocurrency and investors. Afterwards, we'll examine why the Fed is looking at an interest rate hike this week, and the potential pitfalls of that decision. Plus: We look at how one 21-year-old student from Puerto Rico is handling her move to Florida after Hurricane Maria. 

 

Before the sun has risen over central Florida, Nicole Morales is inside a factory building in Orlando with thousands of workers testing out internet routers. She carpools 40 minutes to the quiet industrial complex most weekday mornings with her uncle, a supervisor there. When Morales’ shift is over, she heads across town to the outlet mall, where she sells clothes to tourists.

It is hectic. It is hard. But the 21-year-old is grateful.

(Global Edition) From the BBC World Service…Enthusiasm pushed the price of bitcoin futures up in their trading debut on the Chicago Board Options Exchange. But what does that mean for what many are calling a crypto-currency bubble? Then, we explain the link between Legos and blockchain, the technology underpinning bitcoin. Afterwards, we talk about why global arms sales have risen nearly 2 percent.

Life in rural Alaska is expensive. For the many small villages that are not on the state road system, planes and boats are the only way in and out. For Port Heiden residents in Southwest Alaska, a gallon of milk can cost more than $20, and a pound of bacon can cost more than $13. So two years ago, the village fund raised and won grants to start a reindeer herd and run a farm, as a way to produce its own fresh food.  

The purpose of this farm is two-fold — to provide fresh food and economic infrastructure.

What's behind bitcoin's dramatic rise?

7 hours ago

Bitcoin has had quite a few days. Its price soared to more than $15,000. And as of this week, investors can trade bitcoin futures on the public market — the Chicago Board Options Exchange launched bitcoin futures yesterday, and today's the first full day of trading. What's behind the incredible increase? Kevin Werbach, a professor at the University of Pennsylvania's Wharton School, has a few theories. He talked with Marketplace Tech host Molly Wood about bitcoin's rise and what might happen if, and when, the bubble bursts. Below is an edited portion of their conversation.

Bitcoin’s price soared to more than $15,000 last week. And as of yesterday afternoon, investors can trade bitcoin futures on a major public market — the Chicago Board Options Exchange. What’s behind the cryptocurrency’s incredible rise? And what will happen when it falls? Marketplace Tech host Molly Wood talks with Kevin Werbach, a professor at the University of Pennsylvania’s Wharton School about the sensational rise of bitcoin and what could happen when the bubble bursts.

12/08/2017: Age is just a data point

Dec 8, 2017

Is leaving the coveted 18 to 34 advertising demographic a steep descent into irrelevance, or are advertisers still paying attention to you once you make the jump? Plus, steady she goes … this economy has officially added jobs for 86 months in a row. So why aren’t wages moving? That and more of the week’s economic news on the Weekly Wrap with The New Yorker’s Sheelah Kolhatkar and The Wall Street Journal’s Kate Davidson.

Will Congress reconcile the GOP tax bill?

Dec 8, 2017

Sheelah Kolhatkar from the New Yorker and Kate Davidson from the Wall Street Journal join us to talk about this week’s business and economic news. They touch on the latest numbers out of the Labor Department released this morning and discuss the potential effects of the Republican tax bill on everyday Americans and big business. Kolhatkar and Davidson also talk about the process that the GOP tax bill has gone through and whether the House and the Senate can successfully reconcile their versions of the bill.

His father fled China and rode the escalator of globalization

Dec 8, 2017

Scott Tong's father escaped communist China on the first of two boats. The second boat sank. Thus began his journey to America and better life. He went to college, became an engineer and landed his dream job at IBM. He climbed the "escalator" of globalization and lived what has become the quintessential story of a successful immigrant. Tong himself went on to become a correspondent for Marketplace. But, as he writes in his new book, his father had a brother who wasn't so fortunate.

A Federal Government shutdown has been averted, for now. So what’s next for Washington after the tax overhaul gets done? Well, according to multiple reports out today, it’s infrastructure. The president is expected to release his long-awaited infrastructure plan in January. But the tax bill has some elements that have infrastructure experts concerned. 

Click the audio player above to hear the full story. 

Is 18 to 34 still the most coveted demographic?

Dec 8, 2017

I turned 35 on Monday. And sure, getting older sucks. But it’s not my hair thinning that gets me, or that thing with my knee. The real existential gut punch of it all is that on Monday, I aged out of the coveted 18-to-34 demographic.

For decades, the 18-to-34 age group has been considered especially valuable to advertisers. It’s the biggest cohort, overtaking the baby boomers in 2015, and 18 to 34s are thought to have money to burn on toys and clothes and products, rather than the more staid investments of middle age.

Christmas has always been about consumption

Dec 8, 2017

Holidays, Brought to You By is our series about all the stuff that’s become part of the culture and of the economy. Where did they come from and who thought of them?

Today, after weeks of often bitter wrangling, the Brits struck a last-minute, breakthrough deal on Brexit with their European Union partners. They agreed to some of the key terms of their departure from the EU. The United Kingdom will likely be told next week that it can now move on to talk about a future trade relationship with the bloc. Why should we care? Well, U.S. businesses have quite a bit of skin in this game.

Click the audio player above to hear the full story. 

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