Marketplace

Weekdays 6pm
  • Hosted by Kai Ryssdal

Award-winning Marketplace is public radio's daily magazine on business and economics news "for the rest of us."  Hosted by Kai Ryssdal, award-winning Marketplace is public radio's daily magazine of business and economics. Marketplace takes a fresh approach to business news covering  listeners from wallet to Wall Street. 

The Hankamer School of Business at Baylor University and Mc Lane Intelligent Solutions are local sponsors of Marketplace on KWBU.

For program sponsorship information, contact Bill Leek at 254-710-4472.

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Amy Scott

In the computerized machining lab at Berks Career and Technology Center, just outside Reading, Pa., Tim DeAcosta shows off a state-of-the-art computer numerical control, or CNC, machine. He sets a blank metal plate inside, types some codes into a control panel, and closes the double doors to watch as a tool carves a pattern into the plate.

Can Netflix hook viewers on reality TV?

11 hours ago

Netflix will launch its first reality show on Feb. 24. The physical competition show, “Ultimate Beastmaster,” is kind of like a global version of “American Ninja Warrior.” Netflix is making six localized versions of the show: six different languages, six different sets of hosts and the same set of competitors. It’s part of the streaming service’s promised 1,000  hours of original programming this year, shows that will keep its 94 million-member worldwide audience happily subscribing.

Click the above audio player to hear the full story.

Can the U.S.-Mexico relationship be saved?

11 hours ago

U.S. Secretary of State Rex Tillerson and Homeland Security Secretary John Kelly are in Mexico for talks. They will be covering a variety of topics from security to trade, but most of all, they’ll be trying to smooth over what are now very fraught relations between the two countries. There’s a whole lot at stake. 

Click the above audio player to hear the full story.

Coal country mourns job losses, town heroes

12 hours ago
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Scott Tong

Bringing back coal mining jobs is at the top of President Donald Trump's energy agenda. But it's unclear whether Washington has the power to upend a complex set of trends that have to do with regulations, markets and technology.

In the coal fields of southern Illinois, it's getting harder to find lumps of coal dancing across conveyor belts on the way to market. Last year, some 6,000 miners lost their jobs, bringing the total employment count below 50,000, according to the Bureau of Labor Statistics.

02/23/17: A state of crisis

12 hours ago
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Marketplace

Members of Trump's cabinet are in Mexico for talks, but can they smooth over a tense relationship between the country and the U.S.? We'll look at what's at stake during the visit. Afterwards, we'll dive into how Brexit will affect banking and then explore the job losses that southern Illinois coal towns are experiencing.

02/23/17: Funding in outer space

13 hours ago
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Marketplace

We're look at how public-private partnerships, like the collaboration between NASA and Elon Musk's SpaceX, are changing how America's space program works. Afterwards, we'll talk to analyst Tasha Keeney about how fully autonomous cars may start pulling up into our lives earlier than expected. 

One of former President Barack Obama’s environmental victories was getting automakers to agree to much higher fuel efficiency standards back in 2011. In his last days in office, his administration worked to finalize those standards through 2025. That came as a bit of a shock to carmakers who had expected a chance to revisit the rules. Now, they’re asking the brand-new Environmental Protection Agency Administrator Scott Pruitt for a redo. 

Last of pipeline opponents leave North Dakota protest camp

Feb 22, 2017
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Associated Press

The last of the Dakota Access pipeline opponents abandoned their protest camp in Cannon Ball, North Dakota, today ahead of a government deadline to get off the federal land, and authorities arrested others who defied the order in a final show of dissent.

What Selena Gomez has to do with the 'La La Land' soundtrack

Feb 22, 2017
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Kai Ryssdal and Bridget Bodnar

John Janick took over for Jimmy Iovine as CEO of Interscope Geffen A&M Records in 2014. Iovine hand picked Janick as his successor, and Janick then spent months learning the business from the music legend.

Janick launched himself into the music industry when he started a record company out of his college dorm room called Fueled by Ramen. Its artists included Jimmy Eat World, Fall Out Boy and eventually Panic! at the Disco and Paramore.

Reuters reports that Facebook is in talks to stream Major League Baseball games. That would make the MLB the latest professional sports league to seek a social media audience. But what’s in it for Facebook? Well, potential advertising dollars. Since Facebook can track who’s watching and what they’re doing while they watch, it can offer real-time information that advertisers might be willing to bid on to target an audience at peak game times.

The federal government has revealed plans to step up deportations of the millions of immigrants in the U.S. illegally. Construction and agriculture are among the sectors that lean heavily on the undocumented workforce and, with labor short in those fields, some say the move will have a negative effect. 

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Scott Tong

President Donald Trump has pledged to “revive” the coal industry and deliver the next industry boom. But for historic coal-mining towns, many are asking a broader, long-term question: In volatile resource economies, do the periodic booms get outweighed by the busts that follow? In other words, do the hangovers last longer than the parties?

On its face, it seems a ridiculous question: Can a natural resource be bad for a local economy?

Meet the workplace sensors that are watching you

Feb 22, 2017
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Kai Ryssdal and Robert Garrova

We all know about the sensors that turn the lights off when a room isn’t occupied or dial back the air conditioning when it isn’t needed. But in today’s modern workplace, sensors are capable of tracking much more, including how long employees go without talking with one another, and, in one case, even when workers are away from their desks.

Interscope Geffen A&M CEO says industry has got to figure out streaming

Feb 22, 2017
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Kai Ryssdal and Bridget Bodnar

When John Janick was an undergrad, he started a record company out of his dorm room called Fueled by Ramen. It went on to represent artists like Jimmy Eat World and Fall Out Boy, then later Panic! at the Disco, fun. and Paramore. Now he runs a considerably bigger company as the CEO of Interscope Geffen A&M Records. Janick was hand-picked by Jimmy Iovine to be the music industry legend's successor.

2/22/2017: Let's talk about coal, again

Feb 22, 2017
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Scott Tong

We’ve been hearing a lot about coal lately. Coal mining country came out strong for Trump, who has been promising to bring back mining jobs. We discuss the reality of the boom-and-bust industry with residents in one Illinois town who wonder if they’d be better off without it. From the latest installment of Corner Office, we’ll hear the unlikely story of how the “La La Land” soundtrack came to be from the man who made it happen: John Janick, CEO of Interscope Geffen A&M Records. Plus, how closely are you being watched at work?

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