Marketplace

Weekdays 6pm
  • Hosted by Kai Ryssdal

Award-winning Marketplace is public radio's daily magazine on business and economics news "for the rest of us."  Hosted by Kai Ryssdal, award-winning Marketplace is public radio's daily magazine of business and economics. Marketplace takes a fresh approach to business news covering  listeners from wallet to Wall Street. 

The Hankamer School of Business at Baylor University and Mc Lane Intelligent Solutions are local sponsors of Marketplace on KWBU.

For program sponsorship information, contact Bill Leek at 254-710-4472.

Cream cheese has a history wrapped in tin foil

Apr 26, 2017
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Jana Kasperkevic

This is just one of the stories from our "I've Always Wondered" series, where we tackle all of your questions about the world of business, no matter how big or small. Ever wondered if recycling is worth it? Or how store brands stack up against name brands?

Why presidents rarely tackle tax reform

Apr 26, 2017

President Trump is set to unveil a tax reform agenda today. One of the centerpieces is expected to be his campaign promise to cut the corporate tax rate from 35 percent to 15 percent.  But tax cuts and tax reform are two different things. The last real crack the U.S. took at tax reform was back in 1986, more than three decades ago. Why is tax reform so hard that most administrations simply skip it? 

Click the audio player above to hear the full story.

How the Panic of 1837 predicted the Great Recession

Apr 26, 2017
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David Brancaccio

You may have slept through the lesson your U.S. history class gave on the Panic of 1837, but it's a prophetic subject given the stark similarities it shares with the Great Recession. 

Back then, a booming American cotton industry drove banks to lend money to land prospectors, which in turn, created a land bubble.

Then that bubble went bust.

Following the economic disaster, Americans blamed inner failings — not policy or institutions.  

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D Gorenstein

Paying for health care is an issue that worries many people. In the latest Marketplace-Edison Research Poll, 75 percent of respondents said they were fearful they weren’t going to be able to afford the services they or their family needs.

Yet some state and federal lawmakers want people on Medicaid — the health program primarily for children, people with disabilities and low-income Americans — to be more concerned about health care costs.

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Marketplace

Alphabet's self-driving car unit, Waymo, will now expand its operations in Phoenix, Arizona — a city where Uber has also tested its autonomous vehicles. Why Phoenix? Well, it's in a state that appears friendlier than others to self-driving technology, and there's a growing tech scene going on there. Brian Sherman, a senior vice president at Arizona Commerce, shares what exactly his organization is doing to support innovation in the region.

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Marketplace

President Trump has been talking about tax reform for a little while now. Well, today's the day we're getting a roll out of his plan. We'll dive into the proposals we might see from the White House, which could include a call for lower corporate tax rates and a re-adjustment of the country's income tax brackets. Afterwards, we'll look at how previous presidents have attempted to reform the American tax system, and then explore a radical proposal in Wisconsin that may increase the state's monthly health care premiums. 

‘The Circle’ author Dave Eggers thinks the internet is getting creepier

Apr 25, 2017
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Kai Ryssdal and Robert Garrova

There's a movie opening this weekend that's going to strike a little too close to home for some people in this crazy, mixed-up, always-connected digital economy we live in.

Tom Hanks and Emma Watson star in “The Circle,” a story about the dark side of revealing all online. It's based on a book of the same name by Dave Eggers, in which a mega-tech company wants access to all of our lives.

Run government as a business? Americans are split

Apr 25, 2017
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Sabri Ben-Achour

The latest Marketplace-Edison Research Poll asked Americans whether they thought the U.S. government should be run more like a business. We ask because President Trump on many occasions promised to do so and to bring his business acumen to bear on the presidency.

This is something Americans have argued over for more than 100 years.

This week, President Trump will likely sign an executive order related to national monuments. And, no, I’m not just talking about statues. These are federal designations meant to protect things like public land and water. Trump’s order is expected to review some of them, which could upset a lot of environmentalists. It could upend protections his predecessors have put in place across the country. 

Click the audio player above to hear the full story.

You can have a potty mouth during union fights, court says

Apr 25, 2017
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Jana Kasperkevic

Workplace criticism can be served with a side of profanity during unionization fights, especially if swearing was previously tolerated, according to New York federal court.

Trump’s tax plan raises economists’ eyebrows

Apr 25, 2017

President Trump is expected to unveil his tax plan tomorrow. It would reportedly lower the corporate tax rate to 15 percent. Budget analysts predict that would cost the federal government more than $2 trillion in revenue over a decade. But the administration says the tax cuts will boost the economy so much that they’ll pay for themselves because of increased economic activity. Is that realistic? 

Click the audio player above to hear the full story.

What a $400 juicer says about Silicon Valley

Apr 25, 2017
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Kai Ryssdal

A Juicero press squeezes juice from Juicero-branded packages of produce. It connects to the internet, costs $399 and is not necessary for squeezing juice from Juicero-branded packages of produce. The company raised an estimated $120 million from venture capitalists.

When President Trump promised he'd be tough on trade, Canada wasn't a name he threw around much. But his administration’s first big trade tax turns out to be a proposed 20 percent or so tariff on Canadian "soft lumber." That’s pine, spruce, fir — the kind of wood used to build homes. Secretary of Commerce Wilbur Ross said this is not the start of a trade war with Canada. But it does feel to some like a warning shot.

Click the audio player above to hear the full story.

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Sam Whitehead

Westinghouse Electric Company filed for bankruptcy in March, and it’s still unclear what that will mean for the company’s nuclear energy projects in the U.S.

One of those is at Plant Vogtle in Georgia, where two half-built nuclear reactors sit just west of the Savannah River.

Hawkins Rentals is up the road from the plant. Temporary workers live here in rows of recreational vehicles, not far from large cooling towers belching clouds of steam.

14: Beware of the nurtured narrative

Apr 25, 2017
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Kai Ryssdal and Molly Wood

Nearly three-quarters of Americans say Washington has forgotten them,  according to the latest Marketplace-Edison Research poll.  So what's behind that feeling? And what do you want from government? We'll talk about it.

Plus: a closer look at what it means to "Buy American"  and former Paramount Pictures CEO Sherry Lansing joins us to answer our Make Me Smart question. Finally: We're kick off our book club. If you want to help decide our first read, make sure you vote here

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