Marketplace

Weekdays 6pm
  • Hosted by Kai Ryssdal

Award-winning Marketplace is public radio's daily magazine on business and economics news "for the rest of us."  Hosted by Kai Ryssdal, award-winning Marketplace is public radio's daily magazine of business and economics. Marketplace takes a fresh approach to business news covering  listeners from wallet to Wall Street. 

The Hankamer School of Business at Baylor University and Mc Lane Intelligent Solutions are local sponsors of Marketplace on KWBU.

For program sponsorship information, contact Bill Leek at 254-710-4472.

Altice adds Cablevision to its U.S. cable holdings

Sep 17, 2015
Annie Baxter

Consolidation in the cable industry is continuing. AT&T scooped up DirecTV, Charter Communications bought Time Warner Cable. The latest play: Altice, a European cable and telecommunications company, is snapping up Cablevision, based in New York.  It's Altice's second acquisition of a U.S. cable operator, and the company's presence in the U.S. could grow.

Nova Safo

It took just one day following the release of Apple's new mobile operating system, iOS9, for ad-blocking applications to join the most popular downloads in the tech giant's app store.

While consumers might like the ability to block ads, which are increasingly clogging up the web, publishers are worried that introducing ad-blocking capability on mobile could fundamentally change their fortunes. 

La Tropicana thrives in a changing neighborhood

Sep 17, 2015
Karen Clark

The audio version of this story will be added shortly.

La Tropicana is a corner market in the northeast Los Angeles neighborhood of Highland Park. Outside it has signs for lotto tickets and money transfers. Inside, shelves of groceries crowd skinny aisles.

PODCAST: Who wins from a hike in interest rates?

Sep 17, 2015
Molly Wood

On today's show, we'll talk about the reasons shares in U.S. cable company Cablevision are soaring Thursday morning; what to expect from the (possible) hike in interest rates; and who would stand to benefit most should the Fed choose to raise them.

Home foreclosures down, bank repos up

Sep 17, 2015
Mitchell Hartman

Data firm RealtyTrac reports there were 45,072 foreclosure starts in August 2015 — a decline of 19 percent year-over-year to the lowest level since November 2005. The average number of new foreclosure filings per month is now consistently lower than it was in the years immediately preceding the Great Recession. Back in mid-2009, at the height of the housing crisis, new foreclosure filings peaked just above 200,000 per month.

Airing on Thursday, September 17, 2015: On today's show, we'll talk about GM's settlement with the U.S. government; a drop in foreclosures for August; and the surprising amount of confidence investors have in the stock market.

Marketplace Tech for Thursday, September 17, 2015

Sep 17, 2015
Marketplace

Airing on Thursday, September 17, 2015: On today's show, we'll talk about Comcast's plan to expand its coverage to businesses; banks exploring the block chain; and Farhad Manjoo stops by to talk about mobile ad blocking in iOS 9.

Saving seniors hope for higher interest rates

Sep 17, 2015
Nancy Marshall-Genzer

Update: The Federal Reserve announced Thursday it will keep its interest rate target near zero.

Whenever a long-awaited increase happens, it will make some folks very happy: savers.

Altice has a vision for Cablevision

Sep 16, 2015
Marketplace staff

$17.7 billion

That's how much Altice, a European juggernaut in telecommunications, will pay for U.S. cable company Cablevision. It's part of an effort by the European company to expand into the American markets. As the New York Times reports, this latest move will put it just behind several major U.S. companies like Comcast and Time Warner Cable.

45,072

Marketplace for Wednesday, September 16, 2015

Sep 16, 2015

Knock, knock. Who's there? Inflation. Inflation who? Aren't you glad I didn't say interest rates again? Seriously, folks, we're looking at the good ride borrowers have had; the wages-poverty relationship; and the economics of live political debates.

Keeping medical IV’s safe

Sep 16, 2015
Lauren Silverman

As our devices get smarter, they also are at risk of more sophisticated cyber security attacks.

Think about the cars connected to the internet that make tracking trips and monitoring teen drivers easier. On one hand, they help make our lives easier, but now shutting the motor down with a few keystrokes is no longer science fiction.

Cars aren't the only machines to showcase the opportunities and risks of wireless. Medical devices are increasingly connected as well. Which means they're also increasingly vulnerable.

Kim Adams

Wednesday is the first day of the two-day meeting of the Federal Open Market Committee. And Thursday, we'll know if the central bank will raise interest rates, which have been near zero since the financial crisis.

This guy implanted a computer chip in his hand ...

Sep 16, 2015
Kai Ryssdal and Daisy Palacios

GrindFest is a gathering of people who enjoy experimenting with electronic modifications to the human body —they are biohackers, or grinders. Dylan Matthews, a senior correspondent at Vox.com was there and participated; he had a microchip implanted in his left hand.

On why he had a computer chip implanted in his hand: 

Networks cash in on debates

Sep 16, 2015
Sabri Ben-Achour

 It’s the best of times, it’s the worst of times. If you’re a cable or tv news network. 

Fox News’ Republican debate last month, with 24 million viewers, was the ninth-most-viewed cable program. Ever. The other eight were college football games. 

CNN is now staring a windfall in the face as it expects a record-breaking number of people to tune in for its debate.  

“This is going to be huge for CNN,” says Billie Gold, vice president and director of programming research at Dentsu Aegis. 

The Banker's Almanac: A guide to interest rates

Sep 16, 2015
Sam Weiner and Bridget Bodnar

The audio version of this story will be added shortly.

Comedian Sam Weiner is tired of waiting for the Federal Reserve to finally raise interest rates. So he's turned to the Banker's Almanac.

Will the Fed raise interest rates? For the answer, we can turn to our old friend, the Banker's Almanac.

Like the Farmer's Almanac, the Banker's version provides valuable predictions based on top-secret meteorological data and homespun claptrap.

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