Business review

Being your own boss can seem appealing, but is it all it's cracked up to be? 

 


People who survive, even thrive, in the start-up world, all tend to be “hard-wired” the same. Gritty people have deeply thought out, long-term goals and a “stick-to-it-ive-ness.”

 


 

Shawn Achor researches how people can re-wire their brain to be happier. He says there are two things that accelerate the brain toward growth – the perception of progress and seeing the finish line as being close.

 

 


There are a number of challenges for women in IT today. Barriers stem from the fact that so few women are in the higher levels of organizations to begin with. In addition, the way work-family balance is viewed is still gender biased.  

 


How much should you save for a comfortable retirement? Wall Street Journal blogger retirement expert, Bill Reichenstein, gives some pointers. 

 


 

We've all been in brainstorming sessions that wound up as a complete waste of time. So, how can those minutes turn into time where you find not just any concept or strategy… but a really great one? 

 


Angel investors “fill the gap” in funding young companies, with family and friends on one end and traditional venture capital on the other.  

 


How do certain people achieve such great things? What really separates people who really seem to have an almost other-worldly level of commitment to their ideas? Entrepreneur Kevin Rustagi says some people have a kind of “energy about them” to create new things, and a lot of staying power has to do with grit. 

 


Professor of management Sam Paustian-Underdahl studied a group of nurses from the Midwestern United States Medical Center — the way they managed work and family responsibilities, and how their boss perceived the way they managed it.

 


 

Professor of information systems, Cindy Riemenschneider, says studying overseas gives students a leg up on their resume and opens the door for internships abroad. “It offers opportunities for students that there is no way to replicate that in a classroom. It opens their eyes to see that there are many different ways that people do things that are not like the United States. Their philosophy with regard to work is very different." 

 


 

Happiness fuels success – not the other way around – says Shawn Achor in his book “The Happiness Advantage.” He says that research shows us when we raise somebody’s level of happiness first by deepening their optimism and deepening their social connection, every single business outcome we can test for improves. Productivity rises 31%, sales rise cross industry by 37%, and you’re 40% more likely to receive a promotion. Happiness is actually a precursor to greater levels of success, not merely the result of it.

 


 

Professor and Wall Street Journal blogger retirement expert, Bill Reichenstein, says the investment decision on which mutual funds to put in your retirement plan is simple. 

 


 

Researchers dubbed this project "The Waiter Spit in my Soup!" You might be surprised that over 50 percent of customer service employees are responsible for some sort of deviant behavior toward customers. 

 


Human resources and corporate services director, Jeff Lupinacci, who has worked in all the major regions of the world, gives some advice on attracting and retaining top talent for multi-national, U.S.-based companies. 

 


via flickr.com/photos/rushtipscom/ (CC BY-SA 2.0)

Make sure you understand the statistics before making an important decision. 

 


 

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