Texas

Texas Ranked 5th Worst In The U.S. For Managing Money

Jan 20, 2016

Making money is one thing -- managing it is another. And new stats out from Creditcards.com prove that. The median income for Texas is better than average, but credit scores in the Lone Star State are some of the worst in the country.

Ever since Alberto Perez was a kid growing up in Dove Springs, he knew he wanted to go to UT Austin.

“I remember telling my mom, pointing at the tower, saying, 'that’s where I’m going to go to school,'" Perez remembers.


Last year, there were emotional protests for and against a law that would allow Texans to walk around with pistols on their belts. It passed, and on Jan. 1, Texas became the 45th state in the union to allow the open carry of handguns.

But in an unforeseen backlash, the new law may actually hurt the cause of handgun carriers.

Growing up in Indiana, Phil Crone loved having a bedroom in the basement.

“It was dark. It was cold. I didn’t know the difference noon and 6 a.m.,” he says. “It was wonderful.”

By now, we've all heard about how body cameras could prevent more police violence, or at least catch it in the act. But what about cameras to protect special-needs kids from their own teachers — and the teachers themselves from false accusations?

It'll be a reality soon in Texas. The Lone Star State passed a law in June that made it the first in the nation to make it mandatory for schools — if asked to do so — to videotape interactions between teachers and their special-needs students.

From Texas Standard:

Texas Gov. Greg Abbott has been in Cuba this week talking trade. He arrived in Havana on Monday with a delegation of 25 people to explore business opportunities between the formerly embargoed country and the Lone Star State.

From Texas Standard:

Over the past several months, Texas has become home to hundreds of Syrian refugees. These people fled their homes because of terrible war conditions that made life dangerous, unstable and completely unpredictable – a far cry from the ideals of freedom that both Texas and France uphold today.

After Friday’s attacks, and a report that at least one of the Paris attackers slipped through Europe’s refugee screening system from Syria, many are beginning to wonder if Western countries will continue to be as welcoming.

 


Election-Day Rundown: What You Need To Know

Nov 3, 2015
via flickr.com/photos/stevendepolo/ (CC BY 2.0)

Today is Election Day, and voters across the Lone Star State will be asked to weigh in on seven constitutional amendments. We’ll take a closer look at those propositions and just exactly what they mean for the state. After that, we’ll have a rundown of some of the local ballot items in McLennan County.


Our Friday coverage of the Hidden Pines fire is here.

A wildfire that started Tuesday in Bastrop County continues to spread, thanks in part to high, shifting winds on Wednesday, officials say. 

This year, Texas public schools won’t measure instructional time by days, but they’ll do it by minutes. In the past, Texas public schools years were required to be provide 180 days of instruction. Now, a school year must provide a minimum of 75,600 minutes.


Carlos Morales

Earlier this week Blue Bell Creameries returned after a months-long hiatus that was prompted by a listeria outbreak, which The Center for Disease Control and Prevention ultimately connected to 10 cases, 3 of which resulted in deaths. In that time, the Brenham, Texas-based company shuttered its 4 production facilities to clean and update its equipment and now it’s slowly returning to Texas shelves and people are people are flocking to stores to get some. KWBU’s Carlos Morales has more on what's driving Texans’ true blue loyalty.


Blue Bell Set to Return Aug. 31

Aug 17, 2015
via flickr.com/photos/kalebdf/ (CC BY-NC-ND 2.0)

It’s been about 3 months since Blue Bell Creameries halted production and temporarily closed it’s doors, but by next week the wait will be over.


Today, the U.S. 5th circuit court of Appeals ruled that Texas’ voter identification law violates the Voting Rights Act.


via flickr.com/photos/dionnehartnett/ (CC BY-NC 2.0)

For the first time since 2010, none of Texas is in drought condition.  But that doesn’t mean water worries don’t still plague many parts of the state as KUT's Ben Philpott reports.


via flickr.com/photos/lcars/ (CC BY-NC 2.0)

Immigrant Detention Centers in Texas are starting to release some mothers and their children. That's because Homeland Security Secretary Jeh Johnson made some changes earlier this week to the way mothers and children are detained. KUT's Joy Diaz reports immigrant advocates are calling the changes a victory – though – a partial one.

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