waco

via flickr.com/photos/joshzakary/ (CC BY-NC 2.0)

In September, the United States announced it would aim to accept 10,000 Syrian refugees, as millions continue to flee the violence in their home country. , The resulting refugee crisis has raised many questions, like where can the displaced go. Is Waco a viable option? For KWBU Avery Lill reports 


This morning at Bledsoe Miller Park, community members gathered for a groundbreaking ceremony at what will eventually become the Doris Miller memorial. The event, which took place on what would've been Miller's 96th birthday, is an event that’s been nearly 8 years and 1.35 million dollars in the making.


www.missionwaco.org

Today, the city of Waco rolls out its “coordinated assessment” program, a system designed to streamline and improve access to homeless services in Waco. 


The Maracas Kid was a name you’d probably hear around Waco in the 1950s, but today you’d be hard-pressed to find someone familiar with that name or his story. But Ruben Salazar is hoping to change that with his latest book Shake it down!: A Tribute to Gabino Rodriguez.
 


According to the Waco Police Department, a 48-year-old Waco man who was shot after threatening and pulling a knife on officers has died.


www.flickr.com/photos/samandflip/ (CC BY-NC-ND 2.0)

In the last year, the Waco Fire Department has responded to 21 fires that were “suspicious or intentionally set.” And now they’re asking for the public’s help. KWBU’s Carlos Morales has more.


Dallas-based attorney Clint Broden has released security footage taken from Don Carlos Mexican Restaurant during the May 17th shootout at Twin Peaks. Not much is discernable in the 90-minute video, but you do see law enforcement officials on the scene and more arriving. 

www.flickr.com/photos/51809988@N06/ (CC BY 2.0)

In just three years, the number of Texas microbreweries nearly doubled, jumping from 59 in 2011 to 117 last year. And in that time, Waco was home to just one craft brewery, which shuttered its doors within a year. But as KWBU’s Carlos Morales reports, microbreweries are setting up once again for a return in the Heart of Texas.


Photo via Flickr/plong (CC BY 2.0)

For the first time in a long time, the night of the Fourth of July in Texas will be red, white, blue – and green. That's thanks to abundant rain so far this year. The lower risk for wildfires means more types of fireworks are available for sale across Texas. And as the Texas Standard's Laura Rice reports, fireworks vendors are seeing more people interested in lighting up the night sky for this year's fourth.


 

There's plenty to do this weekend and Act Locally Waco director Ashley Bean Thornton is back in the KWBU studio to give us the latest on what's happening in the Heart of Texas. Act Locally Waco is a new segment you can hear each Friday during Morning Edition and in the afternoon during All Things Considered on KWBU.


Pages