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Urban Edibles: Job-Training Program on 4 Wheels

In the coming week, the non-profit Mission Waco will take to the streets to continue their efforts to abate poverty. But when they do it, they’ll be going down the streets of Waco in a food trailer. KWBU’s Carlos Morales has more
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Seeing no other options to help get her brother Abdullah's family out of Syria and to safety, Teema Kurdi sent him money to get them onto a smuggler's boat that would take them to Greece.

"We actually would say we encouraged them to go, because his brother made it, and there was no other hope," he told NPR's Rachel Martin in an emotional interview. "We don't see the war ending in Syria; life in Turkey is hopeless."

It was a sad day in Houston, as the family, friends and colleagues of Harris County Sheriff's Deputy Darren Goforth attended his funeral Friday. In an apparent attempt to ease their grief, a couple who were at the gas station where Goforth was killed came forward Friday to tell the family that after he was attacked, they had sat with the deputy to wait for help.

Editor's Note: This report contains a racial slur.

A new play reveals some little-known history about the land that became New York City's Central Park: People used to live there.

Beginning in 1825, about 300 people — mainly free African-Americans — lived in a village that spanned a portion of the park's 843 acres in Manhattan, between 82nd and 89th streets, east of Central Park West. It was called Seneca Village.

By now, you've probably seen the photo of Aylan Kurdi, the 3-year-old refugee from Syria who died with his 5-year-old brother and mother after their small rubber boat capsized on its way to Greece. You might remember his Velcro shoes. His red shirt. His lifeless body lying face down in the sand.

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The British prime minister today eased his position on admitting Syrian refugees to the United Kingdom. David Cameron spoke of Britain's moral responsibility.

Copyright 2015 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

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Copyright 2015 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

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It's that time of year when some gardeners and tomato-coveting shoppers face a vexing question: What on earth am I going to do with all these tomatoes I grew (or bought)?

A select few up to their elbows in tomatoes may have an additional quandary: How am I going to prepare different kinds of tomatoes to honor their unique qualities?

Copyright 2015 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

Copyright 2015 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

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Local Weekend Features

Events and Activities during Sept. 4 - 10

There's plenty to do this week and Act Locally Waco director Ashley Bean Thornton is back in the KWBU studio to give us the latest on what's happening in the Heart of Texas. It's Labor Day weekend and there's plenty to do, including West Fest, the Homestaead Heritage Sorghum Festival, and much more.
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Midday News on KWBU

Weekdays at Noon

News With a Texas Twist

Business News

Underwritten locally by the Hankamer School of Business at Baylor University

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Fridays at 2pm

Weekdays at 1pm

Part of the new midday news block

Weekly Folk Music Program