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Clinton And The DNC: A Crisis Not Merely Survived, But Transcended

When all was said and done, Team Hillary had to be pretty happy. Their four nights in Philadelphia turned out better than almost anyone expected.Thursday night featured an orchestrated symphony of praise for Hillary Clinton and a precision-bombing of her opponent, Donald Trump.Clinton's own remarks at the conclusion will not enter the pantheon of great American prose or political rhetoric. But no one had been reserving a place there. More importantly, she provided a fitting conclusion to the...
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I can remember the weeks before starting school at Skidmore College, furiously trying to finish Gregory Howard Williams' memoir, Life on the Color Line. The book had been assigned as our freshman reading assignment — part of the First-Year Experience at the liberal arts school in Saratoga Springs, N.Y.

Four years later, Williams spoke at our graduation.

As the presidential campaign heads into its final months, the U.S. is carrying out daily air sorties in Syria, Iraq and Afghanistan. A major trade deal, the Trans-Pacific Partnership, waits in limbo. The U.S. has begun a long-term pivot to Asia and is bringing more Syrian refugees into the country.

There are apps that can help people with diabetes keep track of their blood sugar and apps that can attach to a blood pressure cuff and store blood pressure information. I use an app called ZocDoc to schedule and manage doctor's appointments. Every time I see a therapist or a primary care doctor or dentist, the data get stored in my personal account.

History was made at the Democratic National Convention this past week. Hillary Clinton, as the first female presidential candidate of a major U.S. party, is officially embarking an unprecedented American political campaign.

We asked women — as young as 4 and as old 77 — how much the weight of history factored into their decision. Listen:

In Rwanda, some consider feminism a dirty word, says NPR's Gregory Warner in his Invisibilia podcast. It's shorthand for too aggressive, too liberated, too selfish. Yet women in Rwanda hold 64 percent of the seats in parliament — more than any other country.

Larry the Lobster was poised to be an inspirational tale.

The 15-pound lobster was at least in his 60s, according to scientists who spoke to the Portland Press Herald and ABC News, when he found his way from the sea to a seafood supplier.

Jeff Melluso, a chef and owner of a restaurant in Sunrise, Fla., pulled him out and propelled him to fame.

You know the TV game show Who Wants to be a Millionaire? Typically, winners get big money — like $1 million — but it's a little different in the version played in Venezuela.

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The United Nations suspended food and relief aid to dangerous and hard-to-access areas in northeastern Nigeria, amid a catastrophic humanitarian crisis affecting half a million people. The move comes after Boko Haram ambushed a humanitarian convoy.

Copyright 2016 NPR. To see more, visit NPR.

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Weekly Features

Events: July 29 - August 4

There's plenty to do to keep you busy this weekend in Wacotown. This weekend the Waco Civic Theatre wraps up their presentation of Beauty and the Beast and Saturday you can check out Yoga For Change at the Art Forum. In the week ahead, there's a fruits and nuts seminar, the Stars over Texas jamboree and much more. Check it all out in this week's episode of Act Locally Waco.
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