Is This The Beginning Of The End For The SAT And ACT?

Many high schoolers hoping to attend George Washington University in Washington, D.C., one of the top private universities in the country, breathed a sigh of relief this week.GWU announced it will no longer require applicants to take the SAT or ACT.The move comes after the school formed a task force to study the pros and cons of going "test-optional." GWU attracts lots of high-achieving students who do well on both exams, but the task force concluded that the school's reliance on these tests...
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Jim McKeown

Story of a dysfunctional family in 20th century Ireland who gather from around the globe to celebrate Christmas.


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Copyright 2015 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

Copyright 2015 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

It's no secret that the water at some of the 2016 Olympic venues in Rio de Janeiro has some problems.

NPR's Lourdes Garcia-Navarro got a whiff of one in April. But the AP has just put some science into it by commissioning tests over a five month period.

A court in Egypt has delayed reading the verdict in the retrial of three Al Jazeera journalists accused of aiding a terrorist organization.

The BBC reports:

"Canadian-Egyptian Mohamed Fahmy, Egyptian Baher Mohamed and Australian Peter Greste were sentenced to up to 10 years in prison in June 2014.

"Their convictions for spreading false news were overturned on appeal and they were released on bail in February. ...

You Say Striped Bass, I Say Rockfish. What's In A Fish Name?

2 hours ago

Order a rockfish at a restaurant in Maryland, and you'll likely get a striped bass. Place the same order in California, and you could end up with a Vermilion rockfish, a Pacific Ocean perch or one of dozens of other fish species on your plate.

This jumble of names is perfectly legal. But it's confusing to diners — and it can also hamper efforts to combat illegal fishing and seafood fraud, says the ocean conservation group Oceana.

It's an old and controversial question: Should federal Pell grants be used to help prisoners pay for college?

Tomorrow, at a prison in Jessup, Md., Education Secretary Arne Duncan and Attorney General Loretta Lynch are expected to unveil a program to do just that. The new plan would create a limited pilot program allowing some students in prison to use Pell grants to pay for college classes.

The key word there is "limited" — because there's only so much the administration can do. To understand why, we have to go back to November 1993.

Copyright 2015 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

Copyright 2015 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

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Shift in Air Time - Fridays at 2pm beginning August 7

KWBU's new website is designed to deliver news from the Heart of Texas in a clean format that's easy to use. What do you think?