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Planned Parenthood Fights Back

In a new report and letter sent to congressional leadership, Planned Parenthood contends that controversial videos alleging the organization sells fetal tissue have been "heavily edited in order to significantly change the meaning" of what its staff said. The report is based on an analysis by forensics firm Fusion GPS, which was commissioned by Planned Parenthood."We've said all along that the videos were heavily edited to deceive the public and now we have expert, independent analysis that...
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Late August may be the absolutely worst time to launch a political TV blitz. But a Democratic superPAC, Priorities USA Action, is offering up a mini-campaign this week and next, warning Republicans that their heated rhetoric on immigration is captured on videotape and being prepped for prime time later in the race.

Boeing is moving to settle a lawsuit accusing it of mishandling its 401(k) plan for thousands of workers. The case is part of a legal assault by a consumer rights attorney to stop companies from offering employees high-cost, bad retirement plans.

Courtesy of Collin County

During a hearing in Fort Worth, Texas Attorney General Ken Paxton pled not guilty to felony charges he faces for financial fraud.


A decade after Hurricane Katrina — the costliest natural disaster in U.S. history — President Obama told a crowd in New Orleans that the storm was a "man-made" calamity that had as much to do with economic inequality and the failure of government as it did the forces of nature.

"What started out as a natural disaster became a man-made disaster — a failure of government to look out for its own citizens," the president said in a speech at a newly opened community center in the Lower Ninth Ward, a predominantly black neighborhood that was devastated by Katrina.

Picking a mate can be one of life's most important decisions. But sometimes people make a choice that seems to make no sense at all. And humans aren't the only ones — scientists have now seen apparently irrational romantic decisions in frogs.

Little tungara frogs live in Central America, and they're found everywhere from forests to ditches to parking lot puddles. These frogs are only about 2 centimeters long, but they are loud. The males make calls to woo the females.

His power and talent tested the nuts and bolts of basketball — literally. Darryl Dawkins, who became famous for backboard-shattering dunks after he was the first NBA player to skip college altogether, has died at age 58.

Lehigh Carbon Community College, where Dawkins coached for two seasons, says:

via flickr.com/photos/jayjayp/ (CC BY-NC-ND 2.0)

When people use fracking to extract oil or natural gas from the ground, it produces vast amounts of wastewater. It’s too toxic to be flushed down the drain. So in Texas, and other states, a lot of it is pumped deep underground into things called disposal wells. Now, as KUT’s Mose Buchele reports for StateImpact Texas  a group of environmental organizations is threatening to sue the EPA over how it regulates the disposal of fracking wastewater. 


Simmons College announced it will close the campus master's degree program in business, the only one of its kind in the nation exclusively for women.

The National Portrait Gallery says it has no plans to heed calls by conservatives and anti-abortion activists to remove a bust of Margaret Sanger from an exhibit on civil rights. Sanger, who died in 1966, was an early supporter and activist for the birth control movement and the founder of Planned Parenthood.

NPR's Pam Fessler tells our Newscast unit that "the demands are part of a larger campaign against Planned Parenthood, after its employees were recorded talking about providing fetal tissue to medical researchers."

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