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Smartphone Addiction Can Be Detrimental to Relationships

Are you addicted to your smartphone? Do you find yourself constantly checking for texts and emails? One researcher has found that smartphone use negatively impacts relationships and that smartphone addiction plays a significant role in our lives.
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We've been talking with a Sunni Muslim who lives in Shiite-dominated Iran. He's a member of one of the two great sects of Islam, which are increasingly seen in conflict. His story suggests just how perilous that conflict could be.

Last month, a crowd in Tehran attacked the embassy of Sunni-dominated Saudi Arabia. They were protesting Saudi Arabia's execution of a Saudi Shiite cleric who had criticized the Saudi government.

A growing number of Americans are driving less and getting rid of their cars.

The trend is gaining traction in middle-aged adults, to the point where fewer of them are even bothering to get or renew their driver's licenses, but it's been prominent among younger adults — millennials — for years now.

"Honestly, at this point, it just doesn't really seem worth it," says 25-year-old Peter Rebecca, who doesn't own a car or have a driver's license. "I mean, I live in Chicago, there's really good access to, you know, public transits for pretty cheap."

Copyright 2016 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

Copyright 2016 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

Copyright 2016 Oregon Public Broadcasting. To see more, visit Oregon Public Broadcasting.

Copyright 2016 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

Mary Louise Kelly talks to Iranian-American writer Azadeh Moaveni about how Iran's intelligence establishment tries to intimidate journalists. In a recent article in Foreign Policy magazine, Moaveni writes about an experience that started with a tweet from someone claiming to represent a popular Iranian TV station.

The father of two men who were among the occupiers of the Malheur National Wildlife Refuge and are now in jail, was himself arrested in Portland, Ore., Wednesday night.

Cliven Bundy, a Nevada rancher prominent in protests to end federal control of western lands, is being held in the Multnomah County Detention Center. His sons Ammon and Ryan were arrested Jan. 27 and are there as well.

Bundy had said earlier this week that he intended to travel to Oregon to support the four men still occupying a government building on the refuge.

In Flint, Mich., government officials allowed water from the Flint River to corrode the city's pipes, leaching lead and other toxins into the tap water. The damaged pipes continue to contaminate the water, and it could take months — or years — to repair and rebuild the water system.

It could take even longer to rebuild something more abstract: trust, between citizens and their government.

Roxanne Adair, a vendor at the local farmers market, says this goes deeper than just the water.

Copyright 2016 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

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via Wikimedia Commons Larry D. Moore CC BY-SA 3.0.

Q&A with Dena Davidson on Gulf War Illness

At least 1 in 4 of the 700,000 soldiers that served in the gulf war suffer from something called Gulf War illness. There are no known treatments for the sickness, but Dena Davidson, director of research at the Center of Excellence for Research on Returning War Veterans at Waco is undertaking a new study to change that. KWBU’s Carlos Morales sat down with Davidson to talk about the illness and a potential treatment.
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Jim McKeown's weekly book review - Thursdays during Morning Edition & All Things Considered and Saturday and Sunday during Weekend Edition