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Surprisingly Few Urban High School Students Take The ACT Or SAT

Waking up early on a Saturday. Sharpened No. 2 pencils and a calculator. For teenagers headed to a four-year college, taking a standardized entrance exam such as the ACT and SAT is typically a requirement. But it's far from a universal experience.In 50 of the largest U.S. cities, examined in a new report from the University of Washington Bothell's nonpartisan Center On Reinventing Public Education, fewer than one in three students takes either of those tests.The rate of taking the SAT or ACT...
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Among the institutions devastated by the flooding in South Carolina is the home of a ballet company.

Dancers from around the world have come to Columbia to dance in the Columbia Classical Ballet Company, founded more than 20 years ago by Radenko Pavlovich.

Now the company's 32 members have nowhere to rehearse or take classes. Their building, renovated just this summer, has been completely destroyed.

During the flooding, water reached up to the ceiling of the studio. Costumes and music scores were ruined.

Copyright 2015 NPR. To see more, visit



Copyright 2015 NPR. To see more, visit



It sounds like a politician's dream: a machine that can tell you exactly what to say to change a voter's mind.

Well, that's what a political scientist has come up with — at least, a first tentative step in that direction.

Using text from a pro-Obamacare website and testing different combinations of sentences on volunteers, an algorithm created by Northeastern University assistant professor Nick Beauchamp was able to identify optimally persuasive terms that make people more inclined to support the landmark health care law.

The signs read: "Take 'em down! Renoir sucks!" and "We're not iconoclasts[;] Renoir just sucks at painting!"

Led by Max Geller, a handful of people protested Monday outside Boston's Museum of Fine Arts.

Their grievance?

The fact that paintings by renowned French Impressionist painter Pierre-Auguste Renoir are hanging in the museum.

Copyright 2015 NPR. To see more, visit

Copyright 2015 NPR. To see more, visit

A former president of the U.N. General Assembly, John Ashe, is accused of accepting more than $1.3 million in bribes in return for his support of a real estate project in Macau, according to U.S. court documents.

Ashe is a former U.N. ambassador for Antigua and Barbuda who led the General Assembly from 2013 to 2014. He lives in New York state.

NPR's Hansi Lo Wang reports:

Under the cover of darkness and using a crane, workers removed a 6-foot granite structure from the grounds of the Capitol in Oklahoma City.

The Ten Commandments monument has been the subject of controversy and debate for years. Back in June, the state Supreme Court decided that the religious display on public property violated the Constitution.

At the time, angry lawmakers even threatened to impeach the high court justices.


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