Bill Chappell

Bill Chappell is a writer and producer who currently works on The Two Way, NPR's flagship news portal. In the past, he has edited and coordinated digital features for Morning Edition and Fresh Air, in addition to editing the rundown of All Things Considered. He frequently contributes to other NPR blogs, such as All Tech Considered and The Salt.

Chappell's work at NPR has ranged from being the site's first full-time homepage editor to being the lead writer and editor on the London 2012 Olympics blog, The Torch. His assignments have included being the lead web producer for NPR's trip to Asia's Grand Trunk Road, as well as establishing the Peabody Award-winning StoryCorps on NPR.org.

In 2009, Chappell was a key editorial member of the small team that redesigned NPR's web site. One year later, the site won its first Peabody Award, along with the National Press Foundation's Excellence in Online Journalism award.

At NPR, Chappell has trained both digital and radio staff to use digital tools to tell compelling stories, in addition to "evangelizing" — promoting more collaboration between legacy and digital departments.

Prior to joining NPR in late 2003, Chappell worked on the Assignment Desk at CNN International, handling coverage in areas from the Middle East, Asia, Africa, Europe, and Latin America, and coordinating CNN's pool coverage out of Qatar during the Iraq war.

Chappell's work for CNN also included producing Web stories and editing digital video for SI.com, and editing and producing stories for CNN.com's features division.

Before joining CNN, Chappell wrote about movies, restaurants and music for alternative weeklies, in addition to his first job: editing the police blotter.

A holder of bachelor's degrees in English and History from the University of Georgia, he attended graduate school for English Literature at the University of South Carolina.

The U.S. economy added 211,000 jobs in November, the Labor Department says in its new report. The unemployment rate remained steady at 5 percent, according to the monthly data from the agency's Bureau of Labor Statistics – the last such report before the Fed meets later this month.

Three weeks after extremist gunmen shot at customers on its terrace, the Bonne Bière cafe reopened for business Friday, serving coffee and pastries to patrons who sat on the sidewalk behind memorials to the attack's victims.

It's the first of the targeted cafes to reopen, according to Le Parisien.

At least 16 people were killed and several others injured at a Cairo nightclub, after Molotov cocktails set fire to the club and restaurant early Friday morning. Police say the attack followed a dispute between club employees and some young men.

NPR's Leila Fadel reports:

"A statement from Egypt's Ministry of the Interior says following the argument, the young men threw Molotov cocktails into the club out of anger.

Marking the 500th day Washington Post journalist Jason Rezaian has been detained by Iran, his brother delivered a petition to Iran's U.N. Mission in New York, calling for his release. The U.S. also repeated its demand that Rezaian be released.

More than two weeks after it received the case, the jury in the trial of former Massey Energy CEO Don Blankenship has delivered a mixed verdict, finding Blankenship guilty of "conspiring to violate federal mine safety standards, a misdemeanor charge that carries up to a year of jail time," as West Virginia Public Broadcasting reports.

Saying America's military must draw from "the broadest possible pool of talent," Defense Secretary Ash Carter said Thursday that women in the U.S. military — including the Army and Marines — can now serve in combat posts.

The formal process to open combat jobs to women began in January of 2013; in finishing that process, Carter acknowledged that in recent years, U.S. women have fought — and sometimes given their lives — in combat posts in Iraq and Afghanistan.

After traveling in the same direction for more than 50 years, Italian tire maker Pirelli pulled a U-turn for its 2016 calendar, putting ostentatious sexuality in its review mirror – for at least one year – to focus on women's strength and achievements in new images by photographer Annie Leibovitz.

Instead of exotic beaches and sensual close-ups, the 2016 calendar presents black-and-white portraits of a wide range of accomplished women, from athlete Serena Williams and comedian Amy Schumer to investment banker Mellody Hobson.

They connect via online services — especially Twitter — and in everyday life. Their ages range from 15 to 47, and their roles range from cheering attacks to plotting violence. And curbing their growth is a dynamic challenge without a simple solution: There are currently 900 active investigations into ISIS sympathizers in every American state.

Those are some of the findings of a new study that glimpses life "inside the bubble of American ISIS sympathizers, a diverse and diffuse scene that the FBI estimates include hundreds, if not thousands, of individuals."

Nearly three months after the tragic death of Alan Kurdi in waters off Turkey's coast came to symbolize a refugee crisis, seven of his relatives are heading to Canada to live with Kurdi's aunt, in a reversal of an earlier decision by immigration officials.

"I was crying," Tima Kurdi told The Toronto Star Friday, speaking from her home in Coquitlam, east of Vancouver. "To be honest, I was like, 'Why now? Why not then?"

Days after a video was released showing a white police officer killing a 17-year-old black man, protesters in Chicago turned out to disrupt traffic and shopping along the city's famous "Magnificent Mile" retail strip on Black Friday.

The protesters chanted "16 shots, 14 months" — referring to the number of bullets that struck Laquan McDonald and the delay in both the release of the video and the pursuit of charges against Chicago officer Jason Van Dyke.

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