Michael Incavo

Reporting Intern

Michael Incavo was a reporting intern at KWBU and a junior at Baylor University. Originally from Cleveland, Ohio, Michael moved to Texas when he began college. 

When Michael isn’t reporting, you might find him playing jazz at local restaurants or sitting in his parked car catching the end of a particularly interesting story. 

In this episode of Shout! host Robert Darden takes us to Oakland, California to visit the Soulful Sons of Zion.


In this episode of Shout! host Robert Darden shares with us a one-of-a-kind, battered 45 from the well-known Imperial Receords and exposes the history behind it. 


In this episode of Shout! host Robert Darden takes us through a protest spiritual with a hidden message of freedom, Roll Jordan Roll. 

 


via flickr.com/photos/ritahogan/ (CC BY-NC-ND 2.0)

Texas has more than 100 national and state parks – the perfect summertime destinations. But if leaving the city limits is off the table this summer, Waco is home to one of the largest city parks in the state – Cameron Park. Reporting for KWBU, Michael Incavo says the park has been a perennial attraction since the early 1900s.


This time of year is rodeo season in Texas. But this one's not what you might think. For KWBU, Michael Incavo has more.


Welcome to Behind the Story, a program where we take you straight to the source. In this episode we'll hear about how KWBU's Michael Incavo -- a native of Ohio -- came to understand Texas when he first moved here. In this episode, we'll hear Michael's original story followed by an interview with McLennan Community College history professor Ashley Cruseturner. This is Behind the Story.


We don’t really think much about trash. It’s just part of our everyday life - we throw things out when we’re done with them. But here in Waco, there are lots of reasons to give new life to some of the waste we generate. For KWBU, Michael Incavo has more on Waco’s recycling program. 


Carlos Morales

From East to West the Lone Star State stretches 773 miles. It’s distance, North to south, from the very tip of the panhandle down to the Valley, is nearly 800 miles long, and the Texas-Mexico border is more than 1,200 miles. The state is clearly a sprawling landscape, but understanding Texas outside of those numbers can be difficult, especially when you’re from out of state.