Marketplace

Weekdays 6pm
  • Hosted by Kai Ryssdal

Award-winning Marketplace is public radio's daily magazine on business and economics news "for the rest of us."  Hosted by Kai Ryssdal, award-winning Marketplace is public radio's daily magazine of business and economics. Marketplace takes a fresh approach to business news covering  listeners from wallet to Wall Street. 

The Hankamer School of Business at Baylor University and Mc Lane Intelligent Solutions are local sponsors of Marketplace on KWBU.

For program sponsorship information, contact Bill Leek at 254-710-4472.

solarpanels_4.jpg
Marketplace

A draft of the Senate's version of the Republican health care bill is finally here. We'll talk about the changes it would make to Medicaid, and whether consumer behavior would change under the plan. Afterwards, we'll look at the conflict brewing between U.S. solar panel makers and foreign ones. Two American manufacturers have asked for steep tariffs on foreign panels because of their cheap prices, which makes it hard to compete. 

Banker to Hollywood elites branches out to South LA

Jun 22, 2017
BankofStars3%20resize.jpg
Aaron Schrank

Los Angeles-based City National Bank’s modern eight-story branch in Beverly Hills overlooks the Rodeo Drive luxury shopping district, where Bentleys and Range Rovers compete for street parking.

The bank began building its reputation 60 years ago as the go-to lender for the entertainment industry.

“Los Angeles needed a bank that would reach out to a community that was not well served by the biggest banks,” said CEO Russell Goldsmith, himself a former movie executive. 

Qatar Airways, the national airline of that embattled Persian Gulf nation, plans to invest about $808 million in American Airlines. This is an unsolicited investment — a purchase of voting shares on the open market. This comes as U.S. airlines, including American, have criticized Qatar Airways and two carriers based in the United Arab Emirates about alleged unfair competition. They say the Persian Gulf governments subsidize ticket prices and service, undercutting U.S. carriers on routes to the Middle East, Africa and the Far East. Qatar may also have a geopolitical goal in mind.

Democratic leaders try to formulate a sound economic message

Jun 22, 2017

Democrats are having a hard time crafting an economic message that gets through to voters. They lost two special congressional elections earlier this week. Some Democrats say being the anti-Trump party is a weak platform on which to take a stand and reach Americans who feel their concerns and needs are not being met. What does the Democratic leadership need to do to come up with an economic message that reaches blue-collar and other Americans who feel the economy is not working for them?

Click the audio player above to hear the full story.

GettyImages-187909355.jpg
Kai Ryssdal

Now that the Senate health care bill has been released, it’s being digested by all the relevant interested parties. Some of those interested parties are people running the state heath exchanges created under the Affordable Care Act. Peter Lee is the executive director of Covered California, California's health exchange and the first created after the bill became law back in 2010. He talked with Marketplace host Kai Ryssdal about the health care policy conversation in Washington. The following is an edited transcript of their conversation.

Republican Arkansas looks to cut its once-expanded Medicaid rolls

Jun 22, 2017
Pannell%202.JPG
Sarah Whites-Koditschek

Willie Freeman works in the meat department at Edward’s Food Giant in Little Rock, Arkansas. He is 54 and has been insured through the Affordable Care Act for four years.

“All the time. I use it all the time,” he said.

His job pays $9 an hour, too much for him to be on traditional Medicaid, which covers low-income people, and too little to be in the health care exchange.

But because Arkansas opted to expand Medicaid to fill the gap, Freeman was able to start going to the doctor.

boyce%202.jpg
Dan Boyce

President Trump has ordered Interior Secretary Ryan Zinke to review whether more than 20 large areas designated as national monuments should remain protected. The goal is to determine if monument status too greatly restricts access to public land and economic activity, like timber cutting or oil and gas drilling.

travel_0.jpg
Marketplace staff

Many view the divisions in our current political environment through a "conservative vs. liberal" or "Democrat vs. Republican" filter. After all, a large number of people in both of the major political parties have said that the other group elicits feelings of fear and anger

GettyImages-501447622.jpg
Marketplace

At long last, Senate Republicans have revealed their health care bill. It was hatched in secret, and they hope to vote on it in a week so let's dig in. It's similar to the plan passed by the House: Sharp and sweeping cuts to Medicaid, more power to states to decide what insurance plans have to cover, shrinking the Obamacare subsidies. Here's what it won't do: make health care cheaper. We'll talk about why, then head to Arkansas, where a plan to roll back Medicaid expansion will put tens of thousands back on the exchanges, if they can afford it.

06/22/2017: Disagreement in the Fed over another rate hike

Jun 22, 2017

As of the late, Janet Yellen and co. had seemed keen on another rate hike, but the mood appears to be shifting. Diane Swonk of DS Economics stopped by to explain why there's some dissent among Fed members. Afterwards, we'll talk about why the major banks are required to take "stress tests," and then look at how America's productivity rate is doing. 

GettyImages-687747966.jpg
Tony Wagner

Politicians love to talk about the national debt and especially the deficit. But as different factions jockey for their plans and policies, things can start to get confusing. Whose plan is going to cost more? How important is it to be "deficit-neutral"? How does the debt ceiling factor into all of this?

On this week's Make Me Smart, we asked "The Budget Guy," Stan Collender, about  it all. He says don't worry if you don't get it, you're not alone.

How to prevent a financial crisis

Jun 22, 2017

The Federal Reserve is releasing the first part of its annual stress tests for big banks today. All of the major banks are expected to pass this year, which is good news if you want to see the U.S. financial system survive a future crisis. The test applies to more than 30 of the biggest banks in the country, and aims to ensure that banks have enough cash reserves to withstand a severe global recession like the 2008 financial crisis.

For NBA stars, branding goes beyond the court

Jun 22, 2017
GettyImages-693508646.jpg
Andy Uhler

Remember these commercials?

The shoes were Nikes, but to basically every kid in America, they were "Air Jordans."

Michael Jordan was, and still is, the brand. His net worth today is $1.3 billion.

The lucrative partnership is an example of how Nike leveraged an athlete's popularity to sell shoes. Back then, what mattered most was Jordan being a great player. Nowadays, how good you are on the court is only one factor in a star athlete's earning potential.

ontheroad.jpg
David Brancaccio

It feels like America is more divided than ever before.

Surveys even show that the country's major political parties have very unfavorable views of each other. But maybe we need to reframe the cause of some of the polarization happening in our country.

06/22/2017: The rise of cryptocurrencies

Jun 22, 2017
bitcoin_8.jpg
Marketplace

Uber is looking to the future after investors pushed CEO Travis Kalanick to resign. But with old lawsuits still trailing the company, we'll discuss whether Uber can truly move forward and if an IPO is in its near future. Afterwards, we'll look at Tesla's scramble to keep up in the self-driving car race, and then talk about the surge in cryptocurrency prices over the last few months.

Pages