Marketplace

Weekdays 6pm
  • Hosted by Kai Ryssdal

Award-winning Marketplace is public radio's daily magazine on business and economics news "for the rest of us."  Hosted by Kai Ryssdal, award-winning Marketplace is public radio's daily magazine of business and economics. Marketplace takes a fresh approach to business news covering  listeners from wallet to Wall Street. 

The Hankamer School of Business at Baylor University and Mc Lane Intelligent Solutions are local sponsors of Marketplace on KWBU.

For program sponsorship information, contact Bill Leek at 254-710-4472.

(U.S. Edition) The Chinese government has seized the control of Anbang, a firm that owns some high-profile U.S. properties. We'll look at Anbang's origins and why China is cracking down on it. Afterwards, we'll discuss a major Supreme Court case that could affect economic mobility. The case questions whether public-sector unions have a right to collect fees from government workers who refuse to join. Plus: A look at upgrades to the Real ID, and what could happen if states don't comply with their requirements.  

02/23/2018: Donald Trump Jr.'s business with India

Feb 23, 2018

(Global Edition) From the BBC World Service … The Royal Bank of Scotland turned its first profit in 10 years, but we’ll explain why looming fears about the bank’s actions in the run up to the financial crisis are hitting the bank’s share price today. Then, Donald Trump Jr. is in India today meeting buyers of his firm’s luxury real-estate business…the same day a new report says inequality in the country has risen sharply for the last three decades. Afterwards, royal waters have plenty to look forward to this year with two weddings and a baby on the way.

Government unions face a big court challenge

Feb 23, 2018

On Monday, the Supreme Court will hear arguments in Janus v. American Federation of State, County and Municipal Employees, or AFSCME. It’s the biggest challenge to organized labor in years.  The case questions whether public-sector unions have a right to collect fees from government workers who refuse to join, but are still represented by the union. 

Should we trust Silicon Valley to fix itself?

Feb 23, 2018

The tech industry has a bit of a PR problem. From tech addiction to online bullying and foreign influence over elections, consumers are getting skeptical about tech’s impact on our lives. There’s even a push from within Silicon Valley to find solutions to these and other issues. Former employees of Google, Facebook and other tech firms have founded  the Center for Humane Technology to address tech addiction, a problem they helped create.

The tech industry has a bit of a PR problem. From tech addiction to online bullying and foreign influence over elections, consumers are getting skeptical about tech’s impact on our lives. There’s even a push from within Silicon Valley to find solutions to these and other issues. Former employees of Google, Facebook and other tech firms have founded the Center for Humane Technology to address tech addiction, a problem they helped create.

Explaining the craze in TV reboots

Feb 22, 2018

Every time you change the channel, it seems like a new reboot is popping up: Will & GraceMurphy BrownRoseanne. These are familiar names in TV, and they're having a come-back precisely because of that name recognition.

If you're a business that cultivates high-profile celebrity influencers, what do you do when one of them expresses displeasure to millions of followers? That's the position Snap finds itself in after Kylie Jenner tweeted that she doesn't open Snapchat anymore. Jenner, apparently, doesn't much like the app's new design, and neither do more than a million others who've signed a petition urging Snap to go back. That raises some questions about Snap's business model. 

Click the audio player above to hear the full story. 

Could kelp help mitigate ocean acidification?

Feb 22, 2018

The tide flat on Hood Canal is only exposed for a few hours a day, so tide is money at Baywater Shellfish farm west of Seattle.

“Here’s a good looking oyster for you. Nice deep cup. Hopefully this will be sitting on a platter in a restaurant ASAP,” said Baywater manager Caleb Davis as he flips and sorts through bags of shellfish. 

Caleb’s father, Joth Davis, founded Baywater back in the '90s. They farm clams, geoduck and oysters. His business is part of the Pacific Northwest’s $200 million shellfish industry.  

But this industry is in trouble.

02/22/2018: Remember when banking was boring?

Feb 22, 2018

Here we are, 10 years after the American financial system imploded, and something amazing has happened. President Donald Trump came into office saying he would "do a big number" on the "disaster" that was Dodd-Frank, but now his administration is keeping key parts of the legislation, like the rule letting the government liquidate a failing financial firm in a crisis. And you know what? Banks seem OK with that. We'll explain. Then: We spent some time last year talking about how the president can affect stock prices with a tweet, but he's not the only one.

About a year ago, Eddie Barrañón arrived in Mexico City. It was a place he hadn’t seen in half a lifetime and where the only relative he had was his estranged father.

Barrañón, a 27-year-old with the muscular build of a former high school wrestler, had been living in the U.S. illegally since his parents took him to Illinois when he was 14. He had returned voluntarily to Mexico after he “got into some trouble,” he said. Like many young immigrant returnees in Mexico City, Barrañón initially found work at a call center making less than $2 an hour.

(Markets Edition) The Fed has hinted that it wants to tap the economic brakes again. We'll talk to economist Diane Swonk about why the Fed is so worried about the economy. Afterwards, we'll look at a new report that shows more Americans are prioritizing savings. Over half say they now have more emergency savings than credit card debt. Plus: A debate in France over how to pay for saving crumbling cathedrals.

Save more or owe more?

Feb 22, 2018

With wages and incomes up, more Americans say they are saving for a rainy day. But it might be wiser to use the money to pay down debt. Marketplace's Aaron Schrank explains.

Click the audio player above to hear the full story. 

Paris’s Notre Dame Cathedral is in a dismal state of disrepair and needs $70 million for urgent renovations, according to Michel Picaud, head of Friends of Notre Dame de Paris. One possible solution for the famous church and other religious monuments is to ask patrons to pay an entrance fee, but so far the Church has been against that.

02/22/2018: The struggle to buy nutritious food

Feb 22, 2018

(U.S. Edition) The Federal Reserve recently issued a statement that we've translated to mean: the U.S. economy has strengthened to the point that the Fed might want to move interest rates even higher than they thought. On today's show, we'll discuss why the markets are getting spooked by this possibility. Afterwards, we'll look at how the Supplemental Nutritional Assistance Program (SNAP) is failing to provide households with enough nutritious meals, and then talk about how clothing brands putting in more effort to make clothing for people with disabilities.

Xian Horn’s shoe rack in her Manhattan apartment is stacked with identical pairs of Mary Janes.

“I have a white pair. I have like a light green pair. I have a cherry oak pair,” she said.

Mary Janes aren’t exactly Horn’s shoe of choice. She’s a disability rights advocate and has cerebral palsy, which affects her muscle coordination. She uses poles to walk and said she’s hard on shoes. Sneakers hold up, but sometimes she wants to wear something nicer. The only shoes she deems fashionable and durable are these discontinued Mary Janes that she hunts for on eBay.

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