Marketplace

Weekdays 6pm
  • Hosted by Kai Ryssdal

Award-winning Marketplace is public radio's daily magazine on business and economics news "for the rest of us."  Hosted by Kai Ryssdal, award-winning Marketplace is public radio's daily magazine of business and economics. Marketplace takes a fresh approach to business news covering  listeners from wallet to Wall Street. 

The Hankamer School of Business at Baylor University and Mc Lane Intelligent Solutions are local sponsors of Marketplace on KWBU.

For program sponsorship information, contact Bill Leek at 254-710-4472.

You know the old saying "an ounce of prevention is worth a pound of cure"? About a decade ago, the Obama administration tried applying that to the fight against climate change. Federal agencies were required to assess the future damages of carbon emissions as part of cost-benefit calculations — the kind they need to do before passing new regulations.

President Donald Trump has mostly rolled back the requirement, but researchers are even now working on a better way to calculate what’s known as the social cost of carbon.

The European Commission on Wednesday fined Google $5 billion over charges that prepackaging apps on its Android operating system for phones and other devices had stifled competition. Google denies the claim and plans to appeal, but the fine may have larger implications for the tech industry beyond Google. The move is the latest example of the European Union taking action to rein in a sector that has been largely free of regulations in the U.S. and elsewhere, analysts tell Marketplace.

Data out today from the Department of Commerce gives us our latest indication that the housing market may be slowing. Housing starts, a statistic that charts when construction begins on the foundation of a new building intended primarily for residential use, declined in June from the month before. Residential building permits also dropped last month.

As Europe goes, so goes the internet

Jul 18, 2018

Antitrust regulators in the European Union are charging Google a $5 billion fine for using its Android software to push out competition and making phone companies pre-install its apps. We'll talk about what that means for the company and the ways overseas regulations reach consumers in the United States. Then, we'll talk about Kathleen Kraninger, who President Donald Trump has nominated to lead the Consumer Financial Protection Bureau, despite her lack of consumer finance experience. Plus: Storm chasing as tourism.

Got a cold or the flu? Think twice about antibiotics

Jul 18, 2018

A new study published in JAMA Internal Medicine has found urgent care centers are prescribing antibiotics to nearly half of patients with colds or the flu. Generally antibiotics are effective against bacterial infections like pneumonia. Antibiotics do not work to treat viral infections, like the flu and colds.

When antibiotics can become a problem

Jul 18, 2018

(Markets Edition) The construction of new homes in the U.S. plunged in June, according to data out today. We'll chat with Susan Schmidt, senior vice president at Westwood Holdings Group, about how much of a cause for concern this is. Afterwards, we'll discuss a new study that finds urgent care centers are prescribing antiobiotics to nearly half of patients with colds or the flu, which could actually end up harming patients.

The California Lottery is breaking sales records. This year, revenues will soar to an estimated $6.9 billion. The recent boom has been fueled by a wave of gigantic jackpots. Newer games like Powerball and a $30 scratch ticket offer huge prizes, and California's lottery players have responded by gambling more and more. Surging revenue should be good news for the state's schools, the lottery's only beneficiary.

The order you were born can have an impact on how successful you are in life, according to Sandra Black, an economics professor at the University of Texas at Austin.

In her research, Black has found that first-born children tend to do better than their younger siblings when it comes to education and earnings. After the first-born, there's a declining pattern by birth order, with the second-born doing "a little bit worse than the first-born" and so on, she says. 

(U.S. Edition) The European Commission is set to fine Google a record $5 billion over antitrust practices related to its Android system. We'll explore what this ruling could mean for the way Google operates. Afterwards, we'll discuss why MGM is planning to sue some of the victims in last October's mass shooting in Las Vegas. Plus: We'll explore the economics of birth order with economics professor Sandra Black. She talked to us about evidence that shows first-born children tend to better when it comes to earnings and education.

The European Union’s antitrust chief has fined Google a record $5 billion for abusing the market dominance of its Android mobile phone operating system.

(Global Edition) From the BBC World Service … European regulators have accused the internet search giant of abusing the dominant position of its Android smartphone system. We explain the implications of the European Union's move. Then, it’s a golden moment for a couple of regions in Africa. Until a few days ago, you couldn’t even make a phone call between Ethiopia and Eritrea. But after two decades of tensions, passenger flights are resuming between the two countries. Finally, where in Africa can you get faster internet speeds than London or Toronto? We reveal all.

Your birth order could have an effect on your future earnings

Jul 18, 2018

We’re sorry, younger siblings: there's a good chance your older brother or sister will end up making more than you and perform better in school.

An article by economics professor Sandra Black in the National Bureau of Economic Research highlights the effects that birth order can have on someone's outcome in life. 

How to be a social media star for a living

Jul 18, 2018

Research from Google says 70 percent of teenage YouTube subscribers say they relate more to online creators than traditional celebrities. According to the research firm L2, 70 percent of companies use social media influencers to market products. As part of our series on the creator economy, Marketplace Tech host Molly Wood talked to Troy Solomon, who has more than 45,000 Instagram followers for his verified account A Bear Named Troy. (07/18/2018)

How to be a social media star for a living

Jul 18, 2018

According to numbers from Google Research, 70 percent of teenage YouTube subscribers say they relate to online creators more than traditional celebrities. The research firm L2 says 70 percent of companies use influencers for marketing. That often means deals with social media stars, who fill their fun-looking social feeds with brokered brand placements.

U.S. risks isolation as other countries sign trade pacts

Jul 17, 2018

Tuesday in Tokyo, the European Union and Japan inked a fresh trade pact that will eliminate most of the tariffs between them. The EU has been a busy bee on the trade front. It recently agreed to a new deal with Mexico, and a new one with Canada is now up and running. It’s in talks with Australia and New Zealand. Lots of countries are forging new trade agreements with each other, with one notable exception: the United States.

Click the audio player above to hear the full story. 

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