Marketplace

Weekdays 6pm
  • Hosted by Kai Ryssdal

Award-winning Marketplace is public radio's daily magazine on business and economics news "for the rest of us."  Hosted by Kai Ryssdal, award-winning Marketplace is public radio's daily magazine of business and economics. Marketplace takes a fresh approach to business news covering  listeners from wallet to Wall Street. 

The Hankamer School of Business at Baylor University and Mc Lane Intelligent Solutions are local sponsors of Marketplace on KWBU.

For program sponsorship information, contact Bill Leek at 254-710-4472.

04/27/2017: Stop judging my outfit, Alexa

Apr 27, 2017
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Marketplace

FCC Commissioner Ajit Pai wants to put an end to net neutrality rules, a move that shouldn't be surprising given the position he took on the issue during the Obama era. But why? Recode's Tony Romm is here to explain why Pai is so against these regulations. Afterwards, we'll look at Amazon's new Echo Look, a device that can snap photos of you and provide some fashion advice. Zeynep Tufekci, an associate sociology professor at the University of North Carolina, argues this is the latest evidence that suggests "surveillance capitalism" may take over our lives.

04/27/2017: United CEO tells us he 'messed up'

Apr 27, 2017
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Marketplace

United Airlines is rolling out a series of 10 changes to "improve customer experience" — a move that follows the forcible removal of a passenger on one of its flights. Among those changes: an offer of up to $10,000 to passengers if they give up their seat. CEO Oscar Munoz stopped by to discuss these new policies, regrets over his initial response to the dragging incident, and why the airline is still overbooking flights. Plus: a status update on reports that President Trump would withdraw the U.S. from the North American Free Trade Agreement.

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David Brancaccio

By now, most of us have seen or heard about United Airlines passenger Dr. David Dao being forcibly removed from a flight on April 9. When video of the incident went viral, United CEO Oscar Munoz released an initial statement calling the event "upsetting" and apologizing "for having to re-accomodate" Dao and other customers.

ESPN announced a long-awaited round of layoffs today. About 100 staff members are expected to be let go, including on-air reporters and commentators. The cuts are a clear sign of the new economic reality facing live sports broadcasting.

Click the audio player above to hear the full story.

What the "Spinal Tap" lawsuit means for Hollywood

Apr 26, 2017
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Adrienne Hill and Maria Hollenhorst

"This is Spinal Tap," the mockumentary about a fictional heavy-metal band, paved the way for a genre of docu-style films and TV shows, like "Best in Show," "The Office" and "Modern Family." But much like the fictional band’s failed entrance to onto a Cleveland Stage, when "This is Spinal Tap" was released in 1984, its box office take was a letdown. But in the years since it opened, it’s become a classic.

Trump tax plan is heavy on cuts but light on details

Apr 26, 2017
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Marielle Segarra

The White House unveiled a one-page outline of President Trump’s long-touted tax plan today. The proposal is short on details, but among other things, it calls for a reduction in the corporate tax rate, from 35 percent to 15 percent. It also cuts down the number of income tax brackets to three and gets rid of the estate tax.

Fact-checking Trump’s latest tweet on the economy

Apr 26, 2017

Key to President Trump’s tax plans announced today is accelerated economic growth. That’s probably one reason the president took to Twitter this morning to complain about modest growth in 2016. He said trade deficits were to blame. "Trade deficits hurt the economy very badly" he wrote. But economists say that’s not really right.

 Click the audio player above to hear the full story.

The 'nerd prom' had critics long before Trump

Apr 26, 2017
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Adrienne Hill and Sean McHenry

What happens when reporters and Washington elites call a truce? They hold the White House Correspondents' dinner, also known as the nerd prom. Back when the dinner started in 1921, about 50 people showed up. Now the guest list numbers in the thousands, and the festivities include a red carpet, and a slew of pre-parties and after-parties, and brunches. What once happened in a single night now unfolds over a week, but the guest of honor won't be attending this year. Instead, President Trump will be holding a rally in Pennsylvania, although he's not the only person criticizing the dinner.

Majority of Americans feel 'forgotten' by government

Apr 26, 2017
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Annie Baxter

Do you think the government in Washington generally represents your interests, or has the government forgotten about “people like you?” That was the new question we asked in our latest Marketplace-Edison Research Poll. 

Despite greater confidence about their economic futures, a whopping three-quarters of our respondents feel overlooked by Washington. 

“We're the forgotten Americans. We're swept under the rug,” said Glen Perkins, 60, an African-American truck driver in La Vergne, Tennessee, who participated in our poll.

Why Net Neutrality Rules are in danger

Apr 26, 2017
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Adrienne Hill and Molly Wood

While a lot of attention today was on tax reform, Federal Communications Commission Chairman Ajit Pai was making news of his own. Pai outlined today what might be next for net neutrality, including a possible roll back of Obama-era regulations on internet service providers. Pai also said high-speed internet service shouldn't be treated like a public utility.

Host Adriene Hill spoke with Marketplace’s senior tech correspondent Molly Wood to get some context on the latest news for net neutrality. Below is an edited transcript of their conversation.

If you can't beat the robots, buy 'em

Apr 26, 2017
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David Brancaccio

Five years ago, Marketplace explored how machines, robots and software algorithms were increasingly entering the workforce in our series "Robots Ate My Job." Now, we're looking at what humans can do about it with a new journey to find robot-proof jobs.

Could we power our economy with old buildings?

Apr 26, 2017

If we focused on preserving old buildings instead of building new ones, could we make our economy bigger and stronger? Stephanie Meeks is the CEO of the National Trust for Historic Preservation, a nonprofit that protects historic sites in the United States. In this interview with Marketplace host Kai Ryssdal, Meeks talks about why our economy needs old buildings, what types of places we need to do a better job protecting and how they prioritize what gets saved and what doesn't. 

04/26/2017: Trump and the one-page tax plan

Apr 26, 2017
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Marielle Segarra

The White House unveiled a one-page set of bullet points today, outlining President Trump's long-touted tax plan. We'll run through those points while looking at what could actually happen once lawmakers start actually fleshing things out. Then FCC Chairman Ajit Pai made a big announcement of his own on net neutrality. Molly Wood is here to make us smart. Plus: more from our Marketplace-Edison Research Poll and the controversy around the White House Correspondents' dinner.

04/26/2017: High gains for the markets and businesses

Apr 26, 2017

This morning, we'll discuss the positive numbers coming from businesses and the markets —the Nasdaq closed above 6,000 for the first time while company earnings reports have been decent across the board. Afterwards, we'll look at the potential effects of Trump's proposed corporate tax rate cut on government revenue, and then examine the disparities in per-child spend at schools in different states. 

Different states spend vastly different amounts on their children, according to a new study out this week. The Urban Institute, a think tank in Washington, looked at spending on public schools, health, and social services and found that the national average is just shy of $8,000 per kid. Some states spend a lot more per pupil than others. The disparities raise questions of fairness and the impact of funding.  

Click the audio player above to hear the full story.

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