From Texas Standard:

My favorite snack as a teenager was a Dr Pepper with salty peanuts. You remember: you pour the peanuts into the Dr Pepper and let them float around and season the drink. Didn’t get much better than that.

Dr Pepper is the oldest soft drink in America. Older than Coca-Cola, in fact, by a full year. It was created in 1885 by a pharmacist, Charles Alderton, in Waco, Texas. And its original name was Waco – it was served there at the soda fountain in the drugstore. The drink was an instant hit; customers would sit down on one of those old spinning stools and say, “Shoot me a Waco.”


Q&A: Andrea Ramirez on Education Equity and Faith

Oct 18, 2016

Today, the 7th annual National Hispanic Education Summit was held in Waco. The event centered on addressing challenges and discussing solutions for increasing Latino college graduation rates. Andrea Ramirez is one of the presenters. She’s  the executive director of the Faith and Education Coalition, a group born out of the National Hispanic Christian Leadership Conference. She talked to us about education equity and how faith can play a role in that.  

Today Prosper Waco holds their annual summit where they will discuss the progress the city has made in areas like education , financial security and health. Ahead of the event, KWBU’s Carlos Morales sat down with Prosper Waco’s Matthew Polk and Christina Helmick.

Featured in this episode of the Central Texas Leadership Series is Bill Clifton, president of the Clifton Group and a founding director of Prosper Waco. Hosting the conversation is Jim Haller, retired bank executive and longtime leader in the Waco community . This conversation was record June 14, 2016 in the KWBU studio.

Since the early 2000s, states from Colorado and New Mexico to Louisiana and Mississippi have come to Waco for the Southwest Regional Little League tournament. KWBU’s Carlos Morales reports the softball portion of the tourney wraps up today, and the baseball version kicks off tomorrow. 

Jim Haller sits down for a conversation with Dr. Roland Goertzon this episode of the Central Texas Leadership Series.  Dr. Goertz is Chief Executive Officer of the Heart of Texas Community Health Center.  

This program was recorded June 1, 2016.

In this episode of the Central Texas Leadership Series: Teri Holtkamp, homelessness administrator for the city of Waco. Hosting the conversation is Liz Taylor, marketing and advertising consultant and member of the Brazos Valley Public Broadcasting Foundation board of directors. 

Are viral law ads a new internet reality?

Jul 15, 2016
Screenshot via YouTube/Hutson & Harris, Attorneys

From Texas Standard.

After a duet from two lawyers in Waco called “Don’t Eat Your Weed” made the rounds on the internet, some say we could see more legal advice through viral videos. 

Of the nearly 15,000 students at Waco Independent School District last year, nearly 10 percent were estimated to be homeless. For students this means they lack a fixed place to spend the night. But this fall, a new non-profit aims to help those students. 

Waco-McLenan Community Health District

The 2016 Community Health Needs Assessment for McLennan County was released today and shows 6 areas of concern and provides a general overview of the county’s health. According to the 2016 assessment, mental health services are the leading health priority for the county, followed by chronic illness, obesity, access to care, prenatal care and tobacco use. 

Today the Veterans One Stop celebrated its re-opening.

This June, Muslims all over the world will fast from sunrise to sunset and spend more time engaged in worship as part of Ramadan. For KWBU, Sakina Haji reports that in Waco, there's a modest Muslim community that gathers to pray together and break fast, or iftar, every night in Ramadan.


It’s been one year today since the deadly Twin Peaks shooting that left 9 dead; nearly 20 injured, and saw 177 people jailed on charges of engaging in organized criminal activity. Since then there’s been a slow drip of information about exactly what happened. 

We don’t really think much about trash. It’s just part of our everyday life - we throw things out when we’re done with them. But here in Waco, there are lots of reasons to give new life to some of the waste we generate. For KWBU, Michael Incavo has more on Waco’s recycling program. 

Last August, the Greater Waco Advanced Health Care Academy opened its doors to an inaugural class of nearly 80 students. These high school juniors and seniors came from 10 area districts to take classes that would help them prepare for a career in the health care field.